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62

All XKCD comics have individual threads in the XKCD forums which discuss the various comics. There is also an Explain XKCD wiki which can help. (Thanks to @alex_d). From perusing the thread: Wandboy = Harry Potter Puncher = Rocky Tropical Boaters = Pirates of the Caribbean Professor Whip = Indiana Jones Additionally, every XKCD comic has title text for ...


14

I realize I'm ludicrously late for this, but the very first parody film was The Little Train Robbery, made in 1905. It was a parody of The Great Train Robbery, made in 1903, which had the same director.


12

Numerous reasons, but mainly because of the Rocky franchise's popularity in the time frame you are looking at. Rocky was hardly the first franchise with lots of sequels when it began releasing them in the 1980s, but it was perhaps the most popular. Unlike other franchises which experienced fast diminishing returns, Rocky took a slight dip with its first ...


10

This is a legal question. At least in the US, parody and satire fall under the fair use umbrella of copyright law. A remake requires permission if the material being remade is copyrighted. You can't remake Star Wars without permission as the story and characters are protected under copyright and trademark laws. You could remake a Sherlock Holmes story ...


9

I think you have Wandboy and Puncher correct. I think user1306322 is right about Indiana Jones. He is a professor and uses a whip and the subtitles line up. I think the Tropical Boaters movies are Pirates of the Caribbean!


8

Alan Rickman was actually parodying himself when he complained about being a "real actor". Rickman was originally a Shakespearean actor, as was Patrick Stewart. So, I suppose there was a little of both of those actors in that character. William Shatner's need to be the center of attention, which is at the center of the long-standing coldness between Takei ...


6

There are a lot of great mockumentary style comedy shows such as The Office, Parks and Recreation, Modern Family, etc. My question is who invented this style? Who was the first to make a show or a movie that way? Early examples of mockumentaries. The general genre of what you describe is known as a “mockumenary”. An early example of this genre is the ...


5

It's a parody of shows like Star Trek (particular emphasis on the original Star Trek series and its Next Generation sequel), the show's cast, and the associated fan culture. Specific characters in Galaxy Quest (the movie) are parodies, less of specific characters than mash-ups. Tim Allen's "Jason Nesmith" is probably the most singularly focused as a ...


2

Parody does not need permission because it is protected under "fair use".


1

Clarisse Loughrey of The Independent points towards Private Lives (1931) as a possible referent for Merrily We Dance, but notes that it really seems like more of a composite of several different movies from an earlier era: The reference point for Laurence Laurentz (Ralph Fiennes)'s high-society drama seems a little more obscure; odd, since the other ...


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