48

They are engine accessory drive belts. They are attached between the engine crank shaft and the engine components like: Water pump Alternator Air conditioning compressor Power steering pump (in some cases) Cooling fan (when not electric) Superchargers Etc. Most of these separate belts were replaced by one longer drive belt called the serpentine belt. It ...


47

Not 100% definitive, but I always thought that he did. Evidence that he kills her: Its explicitly stated that he does in the book The shot of him inspecting his boots on the way out implies that he is checking for blood


37

First of all, the movie is based on the novel of the same name by Cormac McCarthy. Numerous times in the course of the movie you can see Sheriff Ed Tom Bell (Tommy Lee Jones) expressing his thoughts on a moral corruption in society nowadays and often compares it to the time of his predecessors ("oldtimers"). One example quote taken from IMDB: I was ...


24

The title refers to the idea that the nature of evil has changed, and old value systems no longer apply. Both the movie and the book versions of No Country For Old Men repeatedly touch on how the aging-sheriff protagonist feels he's no longer a match for modern criminals. Going a little deeper, I believe the title is a commentary on geopolitics in the post-...


23

The title implies that the sheriff is old and outdated. Unable to handle the crimes of today's crazy criminals. Llewelyn Moss represents the modern day worker. Who gets caught up in the criminal world. Llewelyn should have been able to make his escape with the money, because he demonstrates a coolness under pressure and modern cleverness. He represents the ...


11

It's about the fear of aging/death, and the title is taken from a Yeats poem. The story is really about the sheriff. He's unable to cope with modernity and continuously refers to how the old days or old timers were and talks as if the world is going downhill. Moss represents the youthful search for materialism, while Chigurh represents death. Death can ...


11

Unless I'm remembering this wrong, he didn't plan this ahead of time. He hid the bag in that vent with a string attached to it, planning to retrieve it later from the same room. But when he saw the truck outside his room, he got paranoid and decided to go to the adjacent room and pull the bag through there without the cartel guys (who, as he correctly ...


11

Although I agree with Yu Zhang's answer, I'll propose another way to look at it: evil survives no matter what. Chigurh represents a number of things; to me he is the personification of evil. No rhyme, no reason, no empathy, mostly random in the lives of the people he interacts with, causing suffering (and often death.) And it never stops. There's always ...


10

The story is absolutely about Sheriff Bell, and despite the fact that the majority of the action focuses on Llewelyn Moss, his story is really only a subplot. The main arc of the story actually concerns itself with Bell's decision to quit policing in the face of what he considers to be unstoppable violence. That is the subtext behind the movie's title, as ...


10

Chigurh was called in by the (unseen) ringleader, after the drug deal went bad. His main assignment is to recover the money. A secondary assignment is to kill the guys who the ringleader had hired to set up the deal that went bad (apparently the ringleader doesn't tolerate screw-ups). But first Chigurh needs their information and their transponders, so he ...


10

I think the tear is a sign that Wells got to Chigurh in their conversation, when Wells called Chigurh crazy. Chigurh seems to think of himself as a sort of super-human philosopher who sees riddles that other mere mortals can't see - but in reality he's probably just bat-shit insane. In the scene, Chigurh asks Wells one of Chigurh's trademark wacked-out ...


9

You should absolutely read the book No Country for Old Men, written by Cormac McCarthy. It's a very easy read and short, literary but genre lit, so accessible to us all. My understanding, after pondering both the book and film, is that Chigurh is really of a "force of nature", brutal, uncompromising and monstrously indifferent. Not just a psychopath, but a ...


9

Randomness / Chaos: No country for Old Men, old men can be interpreted as people who cannot keep up with time, who cannot protect themselves. Even for Chigurh, this cold-blooded, calculating murder who takes others' lives as will, there is harm can be done to him in a way Chigurh cannot for-see. I also had this sense of "There is no escape for anyone" ...


9

How does Chigurh know? He makes an educated guess based on the phone bill records. We learn several pieces of information from the phone bill. Moss lives in Sanderson, TX The majority of the calls are to Odessa, TX and Del Rio, TX Odessa and Del Rio are also the closest geographically to Sanderson, TX Odessa is North, while Del Rio, Dallas, and Austin are ...


8

As mentioned in the comments, the movie's themes are explored and contrasted in some detail in this wiki. Some viewers focus on certain aspects of the plot while others prefer other aspects. In light of the title of the film, the following critiques are probably good summaries of what you could interpret from this Cormac McCarthy story: William J. Devlin ...


8

The gas station owner has taken note of Chigurh's registration plate (by asking him about the weather in Dallas), placing him in the unconscious but unenviable position of being a witness to a multiple - murderer on the 'run' (of course it is much more of a chase to catch up with Moss and the money, but the Sheriffs dept are after him). Chigurh realises this ...


8

Here's a clip. There are frames that are more zoomed out, such as 4:24. At 0:47, you can see that they're labelled with the number 15540. When I googled that number, the third result was this. Other than the first two results, all of the results on the first page seem to be fan belts. Also, at 0:05, you can see this is a gas station, which suggests that they ...


6

I think that people are impressed because of the role of the psychopathe. In this movie Javier Bardem proves to everyone that he is an excellent actor. His performance is just amazing, the end leaves the spectator breathless. The story is not so incredible, it's just the story of a man chased by another one. In my opinion, the movie is priceless because of ...


6

Was he anticipating Chigurh to also be there, as the conversation with the local sheriff hinted at it? I am not sure he really expected him to be there. It was more of a hunch, triggered by what the local Sheriff told him: ROSCOE: That don't hardly say it. He shoots the desk clerk one day, and walks right back in the next and shoots a retired army ...


6

The scene where he has the car accident is not immediately after Lewelln was killed. It was much later. I suspect it could have been days or weeks after. Chigurh was the type of person who would not let the wife live but wasn't in a rush to kill her. The car accident comes immediately after he leaves her house. But the money was likely recovered by ...


5

The times have changed. Crime has spanned out across a country that never experienced drug deals gone wrong, contract killers who use automatic shotguns with suppressors, tech nines, or cattle guns to kill strangers passing through. And to steal their vehicles. Sheriff Bell never heard of people killing old folks to cash their social security checks. Some ...


5

The title of the book refers to how Sheriff Bell comes to understand that he is no match for the current and irrepressible evil that the present world had to offer. Through Bell following Moss and Chigurh in hopes to save Moss and capture Chigurh, he must see every gory act of violence and evil that Chigurh leaves in his path. This is a hard and emotionally ...


5

I think that Chigurh was not in the room, but it was the imagination of Sheriff Bell. There are three pieces of evidence for this: 1) In the preceding scene, Sheriff Bell says of Chigurh, "Sometimes I think he's pretty much of a ghost." 2) When Bell is about to go into the room, we see Chigurh hiding in the dark, while Bell hesitates to open the door (...


5

Chigurh has no regard for who he kills at all. He gambled a shop keepers' life on the flip of a coin. He killed those men because he is indeed a murderous lunatic: Man Who Hires Wells: I'd just like to know your opinion of him. In general. Just how dangerous is he? Wells: Compared to what? The bubonic plague? He's bad enough that you called me. He's ...


4

The answer is there is an unseen layer in the movie. In the book he kills off the men who set up the botched drug buy, including the man who hired Wells. He then returns the money to the money man who is not shown in the movie. He then sets himself up as the in between man for the money backer.


4

He's in the room next door. If you watch the scene again, Tommy Lee Jones notices the lock is destroyed and then proceeds to clear the room. The scene then cuts to Chigurh in another room of the motel listening to the sheriff and watching his movements as shadows through the destroyed lock of the door leading to the adjoining room. Reference: http://www....


4

From what I remember about the movie, Chigurh arrived at the hotel after the crime scene was already sealed off and processed/processing by the police. After the police leave, Chigurh goes into the hotel and recovers the money that was hidden in the vent. It was covered throughout the movie that Chigurh has a great tracking skill set. He most likely heard ...


3

The mexicans driving the pick up truck shooting the buck shot at Moss. They quickly cut his tires and went after him for the missing money. They didn't want to kill Moss so he'd be able to tell them where the money is. Poor Moss was providing a generous humanitarian effort to the mexican who asked him the previous evening for agua. These were the same men, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible