40

After looking into it, I found this on wikipedia: Bugs Bunny's nonchalant carrot-chewing standing position, as explained by Chuck Jones, Friz Freleng, and Bob Clampett, originated in a scene in the film It Happened One Night, in which Clark Gable's character leans against a fence, eating carrots rapidly and talking with his mouth full to Claudette Colbert'...


23

The (co-)Creator of Bugs Bunny, Tex Avery, once said: We decided he was going to be a smart-aleck rabbit, but casual about it, and his opening line in the very first one was Eh, what's up, Doc? And, gee, it floored [the audience]! They expected the rabbit to scream, or anything but make a casual remark--here's a guy with a gun in his face! It got such a ...


11

Sylvester actually grabs Tweety several times. Here's one example from Tweet and Lovely (1959) (it's around the halfway mark): And here's another (I Taw a Putty Tat from 1948) where he not only grabs but eats him but Tweety manages to escape from his mouth. Sylvester grabs him and almost eats him yet again later, but is ...


9

No. Despite some news reports about Steve Blanc, alleged son of voice actor Mel Blanc, saying Bugs Bunny is gay and What's up, Doc? is a passphrase for a gay nightclub, it is just a joke article by Citizen of the Month. Note, November 2010: This is not true. It is a joke. This was NOT approved by Warner Brothers. And Mel’s son’s real name is Noel. And ...


8

The first time Bugs uses the phrase is in the cartoon Wild Hare 1940. The rabbit walks up to Elmer Fudd who is hunting for him with a large gun and casually asks, “What’s up Doc?” It's their original phrase. May be inspired from What's up Phrase which appears previously The phrase appears in Jack London's The Sea Wolf (1904), chapter 25 (-- "What'...


6

There are several possible explanations: Several published first person accounts, encyclopedic references, and Warner Bros.' own published material describe the inception of the name and of the character. A model sheet by Charlie Thorson describes this prototype character as "Bugs' Bunny" (note the apostrophe) but in most of the cartoons the ...


6

There is another cartoon called "Greedy for Tweety" (which was basically the follow-up to "Birds Anonymous") and while Sylvester, Tweety and Hector were in the hospital at that point, Sylvester did however manage to succeed in eating Tweety at one point. But once Granny found out that he ate him, she did an X-ray on Sylvester and took him to the Puddy ...


6

By the information you have given, it looks like a short pilot episode named Duck Dodgers in 24½ Century which was released in the year 1953. It stars Daffy duck as the main role an porky pig is the assistant. There are five sequels based on this short pilot episode. So I think you are getting confused about the episodes involving those characters. From ...


5

I would highly doubt that implication. I think the animators were just having a little fun. After all, very little about those cartoons carries over; Bugs doesn't live in the same place every time, Porky Pig's whole personality went through a metamorphosis, Daffy Duck has been paired with Porky Pig, Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. It's an ever changing world. ...


4

It would appear not. The name seems to have originated by his antics when audience saw him (before he had an official name) in the short Porky's Duck Hunt. Wikipedia Daffy first appeared in Porky's Duck Hunt, released on April 17, 1937. The cartoon was directed by Tex Avery and animated by Bob Clampett. Porky's Duck Hunt is a standard hunter/prey pairing ...


2

So, this is just a guess mind you. In 1954, a stop motion movie was released, titled "Hansel and Gretel: an Opera Fantasy". You can watch it here. As I was watching it, the mother, father and sister all call the boy, Haahnzel, rhymes with gunsel. However, when the witch calls him by name, she calls him Hansel, rhymes with cancel. My gut tells me that ...


1

I'd guess it's a crack at the Germanic tongue, particularly considering Bugs' own odd accent. He's probably unaccustomed to it or otherwise finds it amusing or confusing. Think Robin Williams making fun of Indian accents.


1

At the beginning of the episode, Bugs was reading the fairy tale: in that story Hansel gets his feet chopped off so he cannot run away (Grimms' tale were quite dark, you know). I think that's why he repeats the name: Bugs remembers what happens to Hansel, in fact he then says "Run for you lifes. She wants to eat you for supper". Here the link to the ...


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