Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
45

The short answer is: You've picked three of the most talented and, significantly, indulged directors in history (Stanley Kubrick, Terence Malick, Milos Forman) and asked "Why doesn't everyone work this way all the time?" Most filmmakers can't take a year to shoot, and artificial light is more consistent, and can be used in places where there isn't any ...


19

There's a lot missing with natural light and there's a lot that can't be done if you rely on natural light and most of it relates to being in control of your set. Natural light is great... if you want natural light. It has a warm glow that feels really nice on film. It can't be beat... if that's the look you want. Natural light isn't always what a person ...


8

This was intentional, utilized to strengthen the effect of the episode: Unclear outcomes in the fighting This reflects the idea of the fog of war and chaos that arises during battle. Like the characters in the show, the viewers have little certainty as to the outcomes of various clashes, involving characters they've come to care about. Minimal lighting (...


8

As @sanpaco commented, there are many reasons for using artificial lighting: Any set on a sound stage will intrinsically have no lights (or just lights way up on the ceiling). It will need to be artificially lit. If a daytime scene is being shot at night time, it will need to be lit. If an outdoor nighttime scene is being shot, moonlight will not be bright ...


6

The scenes which we see in the movie as night scenes might not be filmed at night. Day for Night is a set of techniques is used to simulate a night scene while filming in daylight. These include tungsten-balanced rather than daylight-balanced film stock or special blue filters, under-exposing the shot (usually in post-production) to create the illusion of ...


5

Links are mainly to 'educational' refs with background info on each topic, rather than IMDB/wikipedia etc. You can see the beam because "movie smoke" is used in nearly every shot these days. You often can't really 'see' it in the shot, but it makes lights look good. Earlier this week, they were actually using 'smoke in a can' which I'd never seen before, to ...


5

This thread on Reddit somewhat explains the effect: A very clever use of the camera frame rate, rolling shutter, and a CMOS censor, combined with timed projection. You would only be able to see this in camera, not live. Another user adds: The laser fixtures are KVANT Spectrums. And I’m not an expert on camera work but I do work electrics for ...


4

You also have to consider hard light and soft light. The first is direct and makes skin look hell, so fashion photographers doing a bikini shoot on a beach might have to erect diffuser screens to soften the sun - or block it out altogether to use flash. Then there is light direction. If you do 100 takes that are supposed to be part of a 2 minute scene, then ...


3

It would tint the light, but very badly, and unevenly (quite unlike the photo). Of course, blood is a translucent liquid that will -- at first -- coat the bulb. Recall that hospitals use a gizmo that is attached to your fingertip in order to measure oxygen levels in your bloodstream. It does this, I believe, by shining light through a thin portion of your ...


3

Two simple ways. Shot on Location or an outdoor set in real light. Any number of lighting sources that have daylight white temperature and CRI (color quality). It's not difficult to have artificial light that mimics daylight through a false window. Seinfeld specifically was shot on sound stages and purpose built sets. What you see is combinations of ...


2

On the screenshot you posted, we can see that it's actually filmed at night (dark sky, visible street lights). But as it's not enough for a film, a few additionnal lights are put on the set. Additionnaly, the blue filter is added in order to make it feel a bit more "like a real night".


1

I saw the episode on Monday on HBO (day of release in Germany). It was very dark, and I thought it was meant to be this way. I tweaked the settings of my LED TV to light it up a little with limited success. I loved the episode so much that I viewed it again about 24h later - HBO (Sky Ticket) again. It was much lighter this time. I believe it may be a ...


1

Compare Tormund and Beric entering Last Hearth, which I suspect was a daylight shot cast with a blue filter to make it look like night, to S08E03, which really was filmed at night. The difference is tangible.


1

Essentially, because that's what the director, Wayne Kramer wanted. From an interview... It was very expensive to light and the producers were trying to talk me out of it — which I’m glad didn’t happen. I was doing some ice hockey research on the internet and came across this Jet Ice black light paint and immediately thought that would be amazing to ...


1

I just want to add a note about "day for night", which to me usually looks fake. The three factors that I think are most important for a convincing "night" scene are: The sky has to be black. If its lit up at all, which happens in every day-for-night scene, the shot looks terrible. The shadows have to be BLACK. During daytime, shadows aren't black; they ...


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