14

Javert reveals his reasons in the song he sings when he commits suicide. And must I now begin to doubt, who never doubted all these years/ My heart is stone and still it trembles/ The world I have known is lost in shadows/ Is he from Heaven or from Hell?/ And does he know, that granting me my life today, this man has killed me even so... I am reaching but I ...


12

No, it does not mean that all dialog is sung, have a look at Phantom of the Opera, Wicked, West Side Story, etc. The reason that the movie has all dialog rhyming etc. (known as 'sung through') is because the West End musical that it is based on is sung through (although there are versions where Valjean speaks a normal line to Javert when he gives him his ...


10

The story has already been shot as a normal movie, back in 1998. And 1995. And 1982. And 1978.... on and on and on. The 1998 version of Les Miserables was a straight take on the Victor Hugo novel, intended to be a po faced English language interpretation of the failed second revolution. It was well received (still rated 78% fresh by Rotten Tomatoes) but did ...


10

This has always bothered me. My impression here was that he was begging Javer for a chance, he made an offer which he would have stuck to (remember Valjean is not only a reformed man but believes his soul belongs to God). However when Javer refuses his offer and pursues him he is no longer obliged to return. A second theory is that when he met Cosette and ...


9

Javert was a man of big integrity and he believed fully in the law and the penalty system. He followed and enforced the law to the letter. So when he realized that Val Jean was doing more good as a free man that he would have done in jail he find himself with a dilemma. He can't let him free because he would betray his integrity, but also he can't stop him ...


6

Wikipedia lists this reason from the musical (which the 2012 film is based on) as: At a convent, Valjean awaits his death, having nothing left to live for. That may be, but he was also pretty old for the time period, and serving 19 years of hard labor probably didn't help. 1768 - Birth of Jean Valjean (book) 1796 - Jean Valjean is sentenced to prison (...


5

It could be that their accents are meant as indicators to their personality and class. In the examples you give: Thénardier adopts a 'fake' french accent, to attempt to pass himself off as more sophisticated than he is. The fact the accent is French is unimportant, it's the act of pretense by Thénardier that is being portrayed. Gavroche is an urchin, ...


5

Strictly in terms of the movie, Thenardier extorts as much as he can from Valjean initially, for the reasons that @Christian_Rau mentions (sees his wealth, knows he's willing to pay a lot). Later in life, their meeting comes not from any pursual of Valjean, but rather from chance. The Thenardiers are living in Paris, learn Valjean and Cosette have moved ...


4

Someone like Jean Valjean. I tell you thing or two about Jean Valjean. He's a criminal, with a criminal record, he know criminals. You don't go to a pawn shop. You go to a friend of a friend who knows a guy who don't ask questions. Also, there is an answer in your question. You know why you call it "liquidate"? It's from liquifing the stolen goods. You ...


4

Actually, this is a point of discontinuity with the novel, wherein Valjean's promise to Fantine was simply to bring Cosette back to live with her and provide means for their support (not to care for her himself), as he expected Fantine to recover from her illness. Thus, he asks Javert for three days simply to get said affairs in order, which Javert denies ...


3

He simply lost the will to live. There is no medical reason given, and he was, as an able bodied male, a bit too young to die of old age complications. It's possible he did have an undiagnosed medical condition, but the story does not touch on that. The state of Medicine was far less advanced at the time. To explain the Average Life Expectancy at the time ...


3

The OP has identified some of the reasons for Javert's suicide. He does sing "Damned if I'll live in the debt of a thief!" but the central reason is the conflict created in his mind by Valjean's actions. He shows this when he sings "And must I now begin to doubt, who never doubted all these years." I myself have found this difficult to reconcile from a ...


3

It is likely that Valjean would have turned himself in. He struggles with this issue in the solo "Who am I?" and resolves that he is tired of lying and running and he should accept his punishment on earth as he will be rewarded in heaven. However, Javert does not accept the offer hence Valjean is under no obligation to do carry out his end of it. ...


3

There is no mention of which version this is, while they are all mostly the same some of the dialogue is different between the regular movie and the musicals, and the non singing dialogue in the musicals is slightly different in parts. so i'll try to stick to quoting what is sung... But a lot of the details is in between songs, but i don't have a copy of les ...


2

I don't believe that any adaptation of the book (or the book itself) mentions this. However, there are always pawnshops and fences willing to take stolen goods from the hand of the thief, and Valjean, as a convict, would have easy access to them. Eventually, since the priest officially said that he gave the stolen silver to Valjean, the thief could legally ...


2

The men working didn't have any reason to take the flag or the mast as part of their assigned duties, and as prisoners cared little enough they didn't avoid trodding over it. Javert however as one in power cares deeply for the institutions of the republic. Not only the law, but also representations of it such as the flag. His request is not really a ...


2

There's a passage in the book. Javert encounters a dilemma: if Javert were to take Valjean into custody, he would betray the humane law since Valjean saved Javert in the exact same circumstance before; if Javert were to let Valjean go, Javert would shirk his duty as a police inspector that he has always staunchly believed in. Javert finds an inconsistency in ...


2

Victor Hugo's piece is a very interesting piece theologically, especially looking a Javert's death. Javert represents the Old Testament, the Torah. He lives the law, and he is the law. Jean Valjean represents the new law, the New Testament, the law of love and mercy. Just as in the Bible, both laws cannot coexist; one has to be done away with, one has to ...


2

I have been thinking about this quite a bit lately. My impression is that Jean Valjean lied to Javert twice in the movie about coming back and turning himself in. The last time when he begs Javert as they are sword fighting that he will return before he falls into the river. My impression is that if that was really Valjean's intentions then he would have ...


1

He just doesn't want her to know about his past as a criminal and prisoner. While that may not be much of a problem for Cosette, this isn't the experience Valjean has made in the past. I'd say he is ashamed about his criminal past and just doesn't want her to know, even if he was convicted for such ridiculously small a crime and has done more than enough ...


1

I would guess that they could either: Have the actors sing the piece through together on stage, have them mime on location and then dub the lyrics Have them singing on location and support them with a backing track. (Do not forget that they would have rehersed these songs scores of times and would know them inside out).


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible