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The method is called Cupping therapy and is a form of alternative medicine. A partial vacuum is created in cups placed on the skin either by means of heat or suction. According to the American Cancer Society, "[a]vailable scientific evidence does not support cupping as a cure for cancer or any other disease". It can leave temporary bruised painful marks ...


8

In his article "The Karate Kid: Behind the Scenes," Tim Nasson interviews the cast and crew of the film. This film is connected to the original in theme and story, though the protagonist this time learns a version of kung fu rather than karate: When the filmmakers decided to open up the movie and go to China, one change that became necessary was the ...


7

Because it's a remake of a film with the same name and they didn't want to lose out on the popularity of the older film. If you have seen both films, you will notice that both stories are quite similar too, only replacing Karate with Kung-fu and changing the location. Sony, at one point, thought about changing it but they didn't in the end: Despite ...


5

I would say that the tournament is fairly unrealistic. Apart from the level of savagery which is unlikely in a tournament of that age category it suffers from too many 'big' moves. I have fought several times under various rule formats and the moment I see a large 'flowery' move I, basically, run forward and throw punches. Their technique does not land '...


1

By cupping with the help of fire or suction, a vacuum is created which creates localized inflammation proximal to the injured/diseased area. Inflammatory substances are drawn to the new area of inflammation by the body, the body rather 'prioritizes' the area to be managed by inflammation. This helps the sufferer to relieve of the suffering due to ...


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