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28

Is there any connection between Stranger Things and IT movie? Yes, IT is one of the inspirations behind the show. From huffingtonpost The Duffer brothers, who actually once pitched an “It” remake themselves, recently told Vulture that the connections are completely intentional. But there seems to be one big hole in the theory. “Stranger Things” co-...


9

The floating of kids were not in the book. The director told GameSpot: "That was, you know, sort of metaphoric in the book. In my mind I suddenly pictured these guys literally floating in the air around that grotesque pile of toys, and it seemed like a great idea". "[In the book] it's some sort of symbolic depiction of dying, and floating is like, ...


8

Just wanted to jump in to clarify this one. There's a very strong theme in the book that Pennywise, in his various guises, is not only an evil force himself but also infects the town and townsfolk. For example, horrible things happen through Derry's history but people, for whatever reason, are able to look the other way, are able to forget about the events, ...


8

Finally, I have the answer to my own question. The thing that was blurred out during the aforementioned two scenes at the cash counter of the super market are boxes of cigarettes Although according to this news report, there were no cuts ordered. But Indian censors have a rule of showing anti-smoking messages on screen when a character smokes. But ...


8

The scene exactly before Beverly cuts her hair in the bathroom is with her father who is standing creepily in the hallway & notices the sanitary pads (I think) in her hand & then creepily caress her hair saying something like "You're still my little girl aren't you Bev". She cuts her hair because she doesn't want to look like a girl. In a later scene,...


8

Those dots are the deadlights (true form of Pennywise) and the reason why the kids are floating is because Pennywise is an entity outside of time and space and as such has mystical powers. The following from here: + Just a note, that website has a ton of spoilers.


7

Wikipedia states: Muschietti confirmed that two cut scenes from the first film will hopefully be included in the second, one of which being: (Spoiler) IMDb states: The young actors who were the Losers Club in chapter one grew tremendously in the 2 years following filming. They had to be digitally 'de-aged' in some scenes as they looked ...


7

It, aka Pennywise, is an alien. It is also a shapeshifter, whose true form looks like a spider. Pennywise normally appears as an evil clown holding a red balloon. But can shapeshift into other monstrous forms based on whom Pennywise is trying to terrify. When It shapeshifts, every kid can see it. There are at least two scenes that I can recall from this ...


7

I happened to find this excerpt from the novel online (my paperback is packed away somewhere in the attic): There was a clown in the stormdrain. The light was far from good, but it was good enough so that George Denbrough was sure of what he was seeing. It was a clown, like in the circus or on TV. In fact he looked like a cross between Bozo and Clarabell, ...


6

There doesn't seem to be a direct explanation, but I would say "yes" it is because of the thing you mentioned. In all of their individual encounters prior to forming their circle, they were almost taken, and in those cases it was pretty quick. King's prose slows down time a little, but they all freeze up or almost lose the ability to act, but then some ...


5

The film plays with several themes around trying to make the kids feel like they are crazy. For example When Beverly and her bathroom are covered with blood her dad acts like nothing is wrong. The kids are afraid to share their various sightings of Pennywise with each other for fear of the others thinking they are crazy. All of the TV shows seems like ...


5

They are able to exploit It's weaknesses "It's Weaknesses" from Stephen King wikia: Despite It seeing Itself as the superior being and stating that Its brain embraces the whole continent, It is far from being almighty. Though It does seem to have significant power over Derry and the town's citizens, It displays several weaknesses which the Losers exploit....


5

Actually IT tries to kill them all in the neibolt street house but it all goes wrong and IT was hurt very badly . That comes as a surprise to IT, and first time in his lifetime IT discover a new feeling "A Fear".(Test of his own medicine :P) Fear to be hurt again,Fear to be killed. That is why IT use new strategy after that incident. He influenced henry ...


4

It's pretty clearly explained by Bill that they all need to go to the Well House to both confront their fears and because It wanted to separate them, which makes them more vulnerable and less able to deal with It. This is proven when they all decide to go their separate ways after their first group confrontation with It in the abandoned house on Neibolt ...


4

Preamble @KDeogharkar kind of summed up the whole underlying premise of It, but maybe I can elaborate a little further. Essentially, It lives off of the fears of other's; children believe in monsters, and that they "exist" under the veil of darkness. This quote from the novel confirms this: What does It really eat, for instance?[...] Certainly we ...


4

Several Days Have Passed It isn't clear in the film due to the way it is edited, but the scene is not taking place right after they exit the sewers but is on a later date, at the end of the summer most likely. Some evidence to let us know this: Stanley has bandages on his face from the teeth marks from IT. The children are wearing different clothing (...


4

The story was told from different perspective but all included the "clown" vision. All the kids saw "IT" as a clown, and they also saw IT morphed into their feared thoughts. So it should be the option c) that you listed.


4

In the novel there is a bit of both - these are children going through puberty. That's what the big scene in the bathroom with all the blood is aimed at. It's Pennywise horrifying Beverly on a number of levels, one of which is aimed at the start of her period. In the book the kids are often sexualized: This doesn't just end with Beverly though - as I said, ...


3

(This answer, obviously, contains spoilers for the movie.) I don't think it's a matter of the fake Georgie saying anything wrong (and there doesn't seem to be a line in particular that Bill reacts to), but more of a representation of Bill coming to terms with Georgie's death.He has seen Georgie's body being puppeted (?) by Pennywise in the earlier cellar ...


3

As you say, It feeds on their fears. It wants them to know It's here chasing them. I think that's why It doesn't kill them the first time around, It wants to scare the shit out of The Losers, not just kill them. I don't think it's got anything to do with the Turtle, Since It's feeding on their fear, It throws oil on the fire.


3

First, let me present some information about IT. IT would sleep for approximately 27 to 30 years at a time, then awaken to feed (primarly) on children. IT also finds scaring children comparable to salting one's meal: IT is a monster of unknown origin that preys on Derry's children and humans every twenty-seven years. [...] IT finds the fear in children ...


3

According to book IT(1986) Children have more imagination than adults have and their problems are totally different as Adult have. After they become adult they just stop believing such kind of things. And it is not totally true that adults can't see Pennywise because there are several incident in books where adult see Pennywise but adult don't find it as a ...


2

What happens in this scene? The same article you linked answers this question. We don't know what was in the scene but there are some possible scenes that were in the screenplay. Early drafts of the “It” screenplay, originally written by director Cary Fukunaga, who departed the project in early 2015, and Chase Palmer, have been thoroughly dissected by ...


2

It was deliberate The website birthmoviesdeath.com published a Stephen King Commemorative Issue which contains an interview with Andy Muschietti in which he says the following about setting the movie in 1989: Another thing too, lest I forget: our movie takes place in the '80s. Obviously, we had to change the time periods for a bunch of different reasons. ...


2

The whole story takes time over whole summer holidays: First we have a screen saying "June" - kids leave the school; most of the movie takes place in this time until the Looser have an argue and split up. Time passes, the screen says "July" - "Loosers" are spending time mostly separately, until events with Beverly force them to unite and fight the Pennywise....


1

I'm not sure if this answers your question, but I hope it helps a little. The creature known as IT is a shapeshifter that usually takes the shape of something the person its "hunting" fears. The drawback to this ability is that IT also takes on most of the "fear's" characteristics, and is bound by that shapes "laws of nature" (I.e. a werewolf can be harmed ...


1

They were obviously very afraid of going into the house. They said that it would be a good idea if someone kept watch so almost everyone "volunteered" to stay out. They did not yet realize that Pennywise fed on fear and that together they would be less afraid and not at susceptible to his power. I agree Beverly staying outside seems to be something of a ...


1

As far as I'm concerned, your guess is as good as mine. I'm pretty certain that it would be a director's addition because there's no canon in the book which dates back to the 17th century. The earliest I can find are events from the 18th century back when the first colonial settlement at Derry was formally established, as seen in this quote: "...the ...


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