29

He did give Sam the antidote, it just doesn't appear to have worked. The clip below has him putting out a syringe and injecting Sam, but her turning and becoming agressive anyways (hence Robert strangling her, so that she doesn't become a vampire). Presumably she was too far gone into the infection, or the compound wasn't that effective, or something; but ...


27

I think the soldier says, "I can't get used to the new regs" as in regulations. It's referring to Neville's (Will Smith's) beard that he has in the flashback. The "new regs" are likely to prohibit shaving with a razor in order to prevent open sores that could lead to infection by the virus.


10

You saw the alternate ending, then. As for your friend, he is slightly mistaken. Will Smith actually blew himself up in the theatrical release. On the Wiki page, you can check out the Alternate Ending and Home Media sections to see where it's available. Also, this IMDB page details the differences. With specific reference to your question: The ending ...


10

They are not zombies, therefore who's to question their level of intellegence? It is a hybrid disease of measles and rabies, therefore I believe they set the trap in retaliation after he trapped the female "dark seeker" and left all of the evidence of his trap behind, and they just copied it to their favour.


7

My interpretation of this scene is that Robert did in fact place Fred there, to keep a sense of normality as someone stated above. After all, it isn't set in stone that the mannequins remain in the same place all the time. I mean, who hangs out at a Movie Store? Moreover, Robert is clearly going insane from being alone and in such a hostile environment. A ...


5

I think a plausible in-universe explanation depends on your interpretation of the scene. My interpretation is that Fred was placed there as bait by the monsters. They set up the mannequin to attract Neville to that spot. That includes a slightly turning head which would really send him over the edge given his current mental state. You can see that when ...


5

Psychological deterioration, due to prolonged isolation In this interview, when asked about inspirations from other films, Will Smith said: What we were trying to do was to completely remove genre; so let’s look at the psychological deterioration of the character and let’s make the small art film version of this movie and then put all of the other ...


5

What it was was most likely vinegar, ammonia, gasoline or something else packing a stench to cover Neville's odor. This seems logical for the "coming home" part, as it prevents the vampires from pinpointing his location. The confusion here stems from him not being "that much at risk" during the capturing part. True, but consider: Neville had to get inside ...


4

Yes, it was to get rid of his scent and the most likely suspect would be bleach. He doesn't want the monsters to know where he lives, however he may very well want them to think he is near the trap. In an attempt to attack Robert, they would act hastily and thus be more likely to spring the trap.


4

He's referring to "new regs," as in Army regulations. Specifically, Will Smith's facial hair, which under current military regs, is not allowed unless you have a shaving waiver. I think this line was written into the movie to explain Will Smith's facial hair, which was easier than waiting for it to grow out for the later sequences (possible due to Will ...


2

I honestly think that in the movie, they were just doing their best to make the monsters as menacing as possible. They are very different from the monsters in the book, which resemble vampires more than zombies like in the movie. In the book, there were even several of the creatures that could think and speak, which made them all the more terrifying. By ...


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