Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
50

This is a case of two extremes. Remy Danton gets pulled over for speeding but doesn't have his license or registration on him. He asks the cop for a break but becomes a victim of racial profiling and is slammed on the hood of the car. After he tells the officers to "google" him to verify his identity, we see the opposite extreme and he is given special ...


41

Pretty sure that's candy corn, a common Halloween candy in the US (note that the episode indeed takes place during Halloween):


39

I'm going to answer for the United States. No. Private media does not require any clearance by the Public/Government to produce, distribute, air, or sell any work of art, critical of the government or not. It's protected by the Constitutional guarantee of Freedom of Speech and Freedom of Press, and even given special protection via copyright law. This may ...


28

It's candy corn. The joke is that many people don't like candy corn. "The 9 Most-Hated Halloween Treats," Huffington Post CANDY CORN "6 Reasons Why Candy Corn is the Worst Part of Halloween", Spoon University "It's not candy, it's not corn, it's earwax formed in the shape of a rotten tooth." Gordon Ramsay as quoted in "Gordon Ramsay Ranks the ...


23

While Kevin Howell is quite spot-on in his explanation of the upside down flag representing distress, I think especially his link to the Flag Code gives another, maybe even better fitting explanation. The country itself is objectively seen not in distress during the course of the show. So while the upside down flag could represent some kind of metaphorical ...


21

A flag being flown upside down is a symbol for distress. As far as the no stars I'm looking into that.


21

Earlier in the episode, Claire was running through the cemetery when she was berated by a woman, who said, "You shouldn't run here, it's disgraceful. Have you no respect?" Knowing the character, Claire's pride would have been dented by having been spoken down to in public in that way. She's a person used to getting her own way. My understanding of the scene ...


18

Judging by the context of the dialogue, the "size of the chair" should mean the title or position somebody holds. The size refers to the fact that the higher-ranking the individual, the larger and more impressive the chair they sit in is. Frank is saying that although Jim is being retired, he's still happy because he holds the title and the prestige. The ...


16

At this point of time Rachel is terrified of Stamper. At first she followed him out of a sense of gratitude and loyalty. After all, he did help her out when she was at her lowest point, providing her with money and a place to stay. As the whole conspiracy with Peter Russo unfolded she began to see Stamper as he really was. Ruthless and manipulative. She knew ...


16

It is only shown very briefly, but she actually uses the gelsemium she got from Jane Davis, which she put into his drink. When she leaves the house, there's a short glimpse of the bottle: As said, she got this from Jane (who imports it from China) for her migraines earlier in that episode: Claire: I just have a splitting headache. Jane: Gelsemium. For ...


15

There are some interesting references to paper, origami, cards, etc. in House of Cards. Perhaps for Claire, it's a reference to two things - one being her suppressed creativity and how that ties in to her longing for Adam. We don't know that much about her past, except that which has been revealed through her conversations with Adam. We also learn a little ...


14

In this appearance on The Daily Show (written up here) Kevin Spacey describes how in preparation for his role of Frank Underwood in the Netflix series, Spacey said he followed both House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who even invited the Hollywood star to a whip meeting... “It feels like you’re watching ...


13

There is a chance he did it for legal purposes. With the speeding ticket written, there has to be a paper trail including the officers names. This can come in useful in case he ever has to raise an issue about racism in the police force or something. It may actually be a case of an automatic reaction by a lawyer. Remember, Remy is (IIRC correctly) a lawyer. ...


12

You are right, the president is portrayed as rather naive and is mostly a puppet in the hands of Frank and Tusk. I doubt that this is a likely scenario in the real world, at least to this extent, and it is one of the very few things one could criticise on this otherwise outstanding show. However, even if it requires a little bit suspension of disbelief on ...


11

He starts walking as soon as he pushes her, and he's halfway up the stairs by the time bystanders notice she's under the train. He walks quickly but calmly, he doesn't run away. In unremarkable clothing, it isn't strange that no one stopped him. As for security systems, if you watch more of the series, you'll notice that Frank is always aware of when he is ...


11

Cross fades and pans are more common in (low budget) television for some reason, and even more common in home video—I have my theories about the causes, but that does not affect this question. View any quality movie and you'll see that almost every cut (99+%) is a classic straight cut. For extra effect, maybe there is a fade to black or fade from ...


11

The ring probably symbolizes a simpler time for Frank. As we saw in his class reunion episode (Season 1 Episode 8), Frank was quite different and more idealistic back in school. He sang in a barbershop quartet, was in a loving relationship, and basically ran wild and rambunctious with his schoolmates. The fact that for the duration of his stay in his school ...


11

There is a reference to 9/11 at the end of Season 4's seventh episode. Frank Underwood is remembering a meeting with Governor Conway. In the remembered scene, Frank asks if it's true Governor Conway had joined the U.S. military after the events of 9/11. The governor responds: "You want a career in politics and the Twin Towers fall in your lap? The ...


10

Initiatives like that, have a huge impact on politics. With his wife running the CWI, it makes Frank look good before the general public. If it were ever to come down to the people voting for him, people would favor somebody who supports such initiatives. It's like brownie points in politics!


10

Rachel is the call girl/prostitute who was with Peter Russo in the first episode. If you haven't finished the season, then just keep watching.Spoilers below if you finished and missed it.


10

The short answer is, Frank Underwood doesn't care if the bill passes or fails. The only thing he wants is for Peter Russo to fail. The longer answer with background: Frank Underwood stated Russo was a pawn. Understand that after Frank is undermined for the Secretary position by Linda (and we later find out Tusk), he wanted something bigger and he wanted his ...


10

Tom Yates, a very famous author dedicated with many prizes, wrote a colorful review of the princess game Monument Valley. The whole review reads as follows (Frank reads it to Yates when they first met): Whoever you are, whoever you think you are, believe that you're also a silent princess. Your name is Ida. Your journey is one through a forgotten ...


9

There is an awesome answer, on Reddit, here. At one point, Frank explains to Tusk why he taps his ring, when he leaves a table or a lectern. To quote from the Reddit posting by thisisntnamman: Frank: "Something my father taught me. It's meant to harden your knuckles so you don't break them if you get into a fight. It also has the added benefit of ...


9

That is an interesting question. First of all, yes, the episodes are all released at the same time and it has always been that way for House of Cards. The main point to consider here is, that House of Cards is actually produced explicitly by and for an online streaming service (and is to my knowledge the first major example of that). This means it did not ...


9

The game being played is called The Stanley Parable. Here is a YouTube video of the scene: This conversation also happened on Reddit... and this one.


8

Opinion-based, but one of the major themes in House of Cards is control of information. The Underwoods thrive because they are able to conceal their own intentions, find out as much as possible about their targets and feed the proper information to proxies like Zoe, Stamper or Russo. Although I can't think of specific examples off the top of my head, back-of-...


8

As far as I can tell, her reason is never really explained in more detail, so we can only speculate. As she admits to Frank she killed many people through missile strikes during her time in the military, even civilians. This haunts her, but she thinks that it could not have been avoided at the time. She did what she "had to do". She does not seem to be ...


8

All three seasons of House of Cards have been released this way. Season 1 was released February 1st, 2013 Season 2 was released February 14th, 2014 Season 3 was released February 27th, 2015 I don't know why Netflix does this... probably because they can. Shows like the ones you mention, Castle & 24, are Network shows. They air on broadcast TV at ...


8

NOTE: I cannot answer this without spoilers ... reader beware. There are several things going on with Doug, Rachel, and the President. Back in Season 1 of HoC, Doug Stamper pays Rachel Posner as a call girl to be with Rep. Peter Russo on several occasions. This ultimately ruined his chances of accomplishing anything in Congress and provides a means by ...


8

By point he means one percentage (he wanted three points in their earlier conversation). By ad-buy he means Dunbar's campaign spending. He would like to receive a percentage of her campaign spending as part of his payment. Note that Frank uses the same expression in this episode: And even so, we need more than ad-buys. We need... We need the philosophy ...


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