40

There is no evidence to show he did this, but it's not implausible. I've read a number of historical accounts of NASA through the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo era, as well as biographies of many Astronauts (though not including Neil) and Engineers on the program and I've never heard of this before. This is covered in an article in the Washington Post. That ...


38

It's an invention for the movie: TheWrap put the question to “Darkest Hour” screenwriter Anthony McCarten, who not only wrote the screenplay but has published a companion history book about the events of May, 1940 — and in the book, he does not describe the scene in the Underground. And McCarten admitted that no, it probably did not happen. But ...


37

This is addressed explicitly in the biography First Man: The Life of Neil A. Armstrong, by James R. Hansen, which the film is based on, and whose author is presumably the Jim mentioned in wcullen's answer. Armstrong never released any information about the contents of his [Personal Preference Kit]. He agreed to do so for publication in this boo, but ...


33

TL;DR Indian soldiers were stuck in the Dunkirk too. And the Royal Indian Army Corps was not only present on the beach, but also involved in transporting supplies to terrains that were not easy to reach. However, the film simply didn't show Indian army, just like they didn't show many others (such as French, Dutch, Poles, Moroccans, Belgians, Canadians) and ...


29

It is based on a real trick, but the sources I provided do not conclusively state if any birds in these acts were ever killed. Only rumors and at least one inquiry, resulting in no substantial proof. It appears the general nature of the trick in The Prestige is a variation of the real life, Vanishing Bird Cage: The vanishing bird cage, also known as ...


26

Not particularly. While it is, in part, derived from European sword fighting, there are also dashes of Chinese sword theatrics (Wushu) along with exaggerated and dramatic moves designed to film well. As with hand-to-hand martial arts, actual real life fighting is a lot faster, direct and brutal. The downside is that these methods don't film well.


25

From IMDB.com trivia section: While John Glenn did specifically request that Katherine Johnson review all of the numbers for the Friendship 7 mission before he would agree to go through with it, he did so weeks before the mission actually took place, not when the countdown to launch was nearing at Cape Canaveral.


24

Gladiator fights have a long cultural and political history. Originally they were held on a smaller scale (than the Colosseum) and often for the purpose of honoring a deceased. Their popularity grew as the rich began to see how they could further their standing with the people. The gladiators themselves were often killed or severely injured, making it less ...


24

Armstrong never spoke about this publicly. Jay Barbree's biography Neil Armstrong: A Life of Flight (Thomas Dunne Books, 2014) says, on p. 272 of the paperback edition, In the lunar dust, Neil and Buzz placed mementos for the five deceased American and Russian space flyers, Gus Grissom, Ed White, Roger Chafee, Vladimir Komarov and Yuri Gagarin (the ...


24

These are lottery numbers. The location above is, as per Graham Greene's novel: “…the square at the top of Lamparilla Street… swallowed up among the pimps and lottery sellers of the Havana noon.” Unlike modern lotteries which are computerised (and often allow multiple 'winners' through duplication), the Cuban lottery took a form where sellers would buy ...


23

According to David M. Crowe’s book Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activities and the True Story Behind The List... NO. Among the key revelations in Crowe’s book: Oskar Schindler did not write out a list of people to save, he didn’t break down in tears because he thought he could have saved more people, and it is unlikely he ...


23

Possibly Apparently screenwriter Josh Singer asked Armstrong's sister, June Hoffman, whether her brother had left something for Karen on the moon. June's response: "Oh, I dearly hope so." "Nearing the bar we were setting for ourselves in terms of accuracy, I never would have felt comfortable doing that on my own," Singer said. "But hearing that it'...


22

I did a little research on this question and it appears that the trick MIGHT kill the canary, or might not, but inevitably did result in a lot of bird deaths. Here is the notice: The vanishing bird trick (which, I regret to say, kills a great number of canaries) is performed by means of accessories in which the costume plays a part. The bird cage ...


21

There's no direct connection Note: This post is spoiler heavy, and using spoiler tags would make it rather cumbersome. If you don't wish to find spoilers, this probably isn't the answer for you. Ragnar from "The Last Kingdom" is Ragnar Ravnson. Ravn being his father. Ravn is the blind man Uhtred meets and cuts food for shortly after being captured. Ragnar ...


20

Did the Battle of Iwo Jima really happen on black soil Yes Iwo Jima is an island of the Japanese Volcano Islands chain south of the Ogasawara Islands and together with them form the Ogasawara Archipelago also known as the Bonin Islands and does, indeed, have volcanic black sand on it's beaches where the Marines landed. It's actually volcanic rock ash ...


18

Yes. It is even believed that the Coliseum in Rome was filled with water at times to re-enact sea battles. From the Wiki: The Colosseum could hold, it is estimated, between 50,000 and 80,000 spectators, having an average audience of some 65,000; it was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles such as mock sea battles, animal hunts, ...


16

This pyramid building civilization has many similarities to both the ancient Egyptian civilization and also to the civilizations of Mesopotamia (which you probably mean with Persian-like). From those two, the latter is/are actually a bit older and marks the beginning of city building. But nevertheless such large buildings as the Egyptian pyramids or the ...


15

I wouldn't look at the main occupation of the characters in the movie as some attempt at being historically accurate to the times. As noted on Wikipedia: Shot primarily in Austin, Texas, the origins for Office Space lie in a series of four animated short films about an office drone named Milton that Mike Judge created, which first aired on Liquid ...


13

I don't know if it is ancient culture or not, but that necklace was given to him by his wife right before his departure for the hot gates. I believe the reason he gives it back is as a way to tell his wife he is gone.


13

According to all-knowing Wikipedia (smile): In the end, authorities pointed out that the chances of the prisoners surviving the trip across the bay were slim. At the time, there was no discovery of robberies or car thefts that could have been attributed to them, and the men were habitual criminals yet were never arrested again. The FBI officially ...


13

You are 100% correct. According to this excellent article on Kotaku, pretty much everything most people assume about ninjas—black pajamas, throwing stars, swords, etc…—is utter nonsense. The traditional role that grew to be known as a “ninja” was simply that of a spy. As Matt Alt—co-author of the book Ninja Attack—explains: A 15th century ninja would ...


13

According to Atlas Obscura: First of all, it’s important to note that the Indian Burial Ground, which is sometimes abbreviated to IBG, is a trope, and not a real thing. Pre-Columbian peoples identified as hundreds of totally different communities, families, or nations, without very many similarities between them. That extended to the burying and ...


13

Well, according to Wikipedia, the answer is different. Nearly seven hours into the concert in London, Bob Geldof enquired how much money had been raised so far; he was told about £1.2 million. He is said to have been sorely disappointed by the amount and marched to the BBC commentary position. Pumped up further by a performance by Queen which he later ...


13

The HBO show depicts events very close to the official soviet version of accident which was presented at IAEA meeting in Vienna in 1986 with Legasov as the head of the soviet delegation and which was used as the source for INSAG-1 report. As Legasov says in the show, many things they presented in Vienna were lies which put the blame on the operators to hide ...


12

This scene was meant to put a spotlight on Jobs' darker side, but the event never really happened. In a fact check, this scene was specifically mentioned: Take the movie's font scene. At an all-hands meeting, an employee dares to question Jobs’s choice of “adding pretty fonts” on the Lisa computer, the forerunner to the Macintosh, causing Jobs to fire ...


12

Your parallel is slightly off. It's not Biko that Wikus is related to but Biko's friend, Donald Woods from "Cry Freedom". Both Wikus and Woods were initially of the governing race, and both started with adversarial relationship to Biko/alien known as Christopher Johnson, only later to turn into friends.


12

Whether the police brutality/harassment scenes in the movie were embellished for creative licensing or not, the fact remains that police corruption, racism and brutality ran rampant in predominantly African American communities such as Compton: a significant number [of LAPD officers] who "repetitively use excessive force against the public and ...


12

There is a nice article about this There are very interesting facts about this: Perhaps the biggest misconception about the Christmas Truce of 1914 is that it was limited to the days around Christmas. In fact, fraternization had often occurred in war; it wasn’t all that uncommon for soldiers who had been shooting at one another one day to wave a ...


11

It is worth bearing in mind that single handed swords did little against plate armour, they did little against maille and padding unless you landed a good solid thrust. Curved swords have almost no affect against solid armour too. I have suits of maille and plate and regualarly fight in tournaments wearing them. We have fought at full power with swords ...


11

Basically, it wouldn't. The original Turing Machine (Or Christopher as it was named) was never programmed to identify words: it was programmed to identify consistencies. The enigma code wasn't deciphered through letters, it was deciphered through a tape displacement procedure known as its 'primitive operation' that's chosen signifiers are still honored ...


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