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19

While I for myself am not sure if there was any tension (especially a continuous tension pulling him away even after his motion has been stopped by Dr. Stone), this interview with a real astronaut suggests there wasn't, especially this section: We see quite a few worst-case scenarios in the film. George Clooney ends up untethering himself from his ...


11

Whilst accurate in many details, Gravity is not accurate in others, most notably in the relative orbital arrangements of Hubble & the International Space Station (ISS). Details about the Chinese Tiangong space station don't appear to be accurate either. The US Space Shuttle had its last flight in July 2011, the Tiangong-1 space station was placed in its ...


11

Apart from the actors (who, as you say, are on wires in front of a green screen, or possibly even riding the vomit comet for that authentic low-gravity look), almost the entirety of these two scenes would have been computer generated and layered in. This video shows the various layers of CG rendering were put together to produce the spectacle. Even the ...


9

There are many things symbolised in the radio conversation with Aningaaq (an Inuit somewhere in the middle of an arctic wilderness). Some are more apparent if you watch the conversation from Aningaaq's side which, amazingly, was filmed as an add-on to the movie by Jonas Cuaron (son of the director and co-writer). The short movie can be seen here. I'd say ...


9

First of all, the NASA noticed the destruction of the Russian satellite early on and even informs the crew about it, though just saying that it won't impede their operation. What they didn't anticipate was the resulting chain reaction with debris creating more debris and so on. This was indeed only noticed by the NASA when it was already too late (yet still ...


7

It was filmed in Lake Powell, near the border of Utah and Arizona. This blog mentioned the IMDB page listing the film locations used for the movie and gave some analysis on where the scene might have taken place. Although we know where the movie was shot, there's no indication whether the scene was supposed to be there, story-wise. However, there were ...


7

Sigh. Another Gravity Realism Question. I'm kidding of course. I was caught out by this attitude when I posted my own question about the Physics of the movie. As much as you'll want a decent answer to this, it's likely that the only one you'll get is the same as mine; the film is hugely flawed, scientifically speaking. I'll refer you to the link Christian ...


4

Surely the character knows this will happen through her training. Of course she knows it will happen. There is (possibly) pressure on the inside and certainly none at the outside: it is physics basics, no training needed. But I doubt that Ryan Stone's training dealt with this kind of an emergency situation. She has had six months of training according to ...


4

My guess is that even though the parachute lines had stopped slipping on Stone's leg, the parachute itself was still slipping through the wreckage, and Stone and Kowalski still had momentum directed away from the wreckage. The friction of the parachute against the wreckage was slowing their momentum and causing the tension. Kowalski was facing the ...


4

There is formal education. And, there is informal education. You would have to have an education in order to make a film like Gravity. It would not necessarily have to be a college/university education. In order to have the ability to make such a film, you would have to acquire the proper education, training, coaching, etc., along with a bit of natural ...


3

We neither know nor care. Now first of all, I have seen the film, but am still going to call this out as simply physically incorrect. But before writing the answer off as another one of those "the science of the movie was just inaccurate" answers, please let me reason why I still think this to be relevant for your employed viewpoint here. Now first of all, ...


3

Well, I would say she was just drifting off a bit at this point. She reached someone on the radio, just to realize that it was an unkown man that couldn't understand a word she was saying. In addition to this she was out of fuel and without any hope to get home again. She was at this point already preparing to die out there and was rather content with it. ...


3

I'm not a physicist but basically it comes down to Newton's three laws of motion. Basically, an object in motion will stay in motion unless another force stops it. In space, the only thing that could really stop his momentum would be an object of greater mass, but the two astronauts are approximately the same mass so in effect, he was transferring his ...


2

Makes no sense regarding what is depicted in the scene What would have made sense for this setup is if they had a centrifugal force on them (e.g. by making the whole station rotate slowly, maybe caused by a previous hit) But in the scene it was pretty clear that the station had no visible angular velocity and the slow cascading untanglement of the ...


1

If you remember when her capsule sinks to the bottom of the lake (about 10 meters) a frog swims up the bottom. Frogs normally don't frequent those depths except in Lake Titicaca in Peru where they are adapted to live at those depths. I guessing Lake Titicaca. I'd love for someone to confirm the landing spot.


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