16

I just did a bit of digging on your behalf regarding this line, and there seems to be no concrete definition of it from any official source. That said, I found several interpretations along the way, including: 1) "You cannot wash away your sins."; 2) The blood is worn as a badge of merit on the blade; 3) The blood remains on the blade and not on your ...


13

Because it was "inspired" by it, not "based" on it. Herbert Asbury's book (as you've mentioned in your quote) is non-fiction. It was about the real and historic Gangs of New York. Now the movie was completely fictional, only loosely following the real historic events (which Asbury didn't author but reported), so it's considered to be a standalone screenplay, ...


8

Julia Turner at Slate had the same question back in February 2003: Jay Cocks, a longtime Scorsese collaborator and one of film's three credited writers, told Explainer that most of the script was an original creation: "This is a world we conjured out of whole cloth, out of a whole lot of unassimilated historical research." He says Asbury's book, ...


6

It is clear that Union infantry and cavalry engaged the rioters in the streets, contributing to the substantial loss of life: During the Draft Riots of 1863, Union troops were called in to restore order. Here the rioters (pictured) battled Union forces along First Avenue, between 11th and 14th Streets (note the cannon firing in the background) Columbia ...


5

I found this mention on a historical website called the Cleaveland Civil War Roundtable: One mob looted and burned a block of elegant houses on Lexington Avenue near Forty-Sixth Street; another set fire to the draft office on Broadway near Twenty-Ninth Street. Other rioters extorted money or liquor from merchants or saloonkeepers. When detectives heard ...


5

Because for them it was entertainment. Historically, public executions were spectacles often witnessed by huge crowds An Act of Parliament ended public hangings in Britain in 1868, but it took America nearly seventy more years to follow suit. In colonial times, says one account, “Crowds of thirty thousand or more were expected to be at high ...


3

An unnamed assassin The IMDB cast list has him as 'Assassin', played by Bronco McLoughlin Who was he? Based on his attempt on Bill's life, and the cross he carries, it seems likely that he was linked with the Dead Rabbits, and was waiting for an opportune moment to kill Bill, possibly in revenge for the murder of Priest Vallon. What was he saying? There ...


2

Although, I found no direct remarks or a mention of what specific role did that Asian play in the first plot of Amsterdam to kill Bill The Butcher,but through these scenes, we can come to a conclusion. I did not find any uploaded videos so created a screenshot in order. Amsterdam goes to the Chinese Pagoda and shows this Asian person a print of the hand ...


2

Cannons were fired in anger in an American City, in the Philadelphia Nativist Riots in 1844 by both sides. I have not read of naval guns being used in the New York City draft riots of 1863. In those days naval guns were far more powerful than field artillery used by armies. I believe that if even small warships fired upon a city neighborhood it would be ...


2

Complex Danish and/or Celtic feelings of remorse for family honor/protectiveness and achievement.


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