7

This is an example of Art Imitates Life but that's not the TVTrope link you need. This is the TVTropes link you deserve Object Ceiling Cling Basically, in storytelling, it's a comedic effect to have things stuck in the ceiling and maybe fall after. However, there are specific pencil references in that link: Live-Action TV An episode of Coach featured Luther ...


6

Back in the 30's and 40's, Warner Brothers used to produce a yearly "Breakdowns" film containing bloopers from films produced during the last year. They'd show the films during an annual dinner for the staff. You can find a collection of these films on archive.org. The earliest one in their collection is Breakdowns of 1936. The films are in the public ...


6

Maybe not quite what you're looking for, since this isn't a movie and Google itself wasn't shown on screen, but the first known use of the verb "to google" in pop culture media was in an episode of Buffy the Vampire Slayer from 2002. Sources: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/06/the-first-use-of-the-verb-to-google-on-television-...


6

It is hard to say definitively, mostly because (a) much of the early film record is lost and/or incomplete and (b) because there doesn't appear to be any exhaustive directory chronicling the relative order that comic-based films were released. However, the earliest known feature film I could find based on a comic (not vice versa) is a 1926 live-action ...


5

There are several different versions of this appearing in television, however the earliest film version that I could find was the 1968 Italian film, Danger: Diabolik. Directed by de Laurentis, and a score by Ennio Morricone, it features a criminal named Diabolik who plans large heists for his girlfriend. It was an adaptation from existing comics at the time. ...


5

From pagalparrot You will get surprised to know that the world’s first porn film was made in 1896 during the silent era of films. It was a seven-minute French film that featured a woman stripteasing in the bathroom, gets bathed, and then gets dressed again. The name of the movie was “Le Coucher de la Mariée.” From Wikipedia The original film has been ...


5

Victor Halperin's White Zombie was released in 1932 and is often cited as the first zombie film. Wikipedia - List of Zombie films White Zombie is considered to be the first feature length zombie film and has been described as the archetype and model of all zombie movies. Not many early horror films followed White Zombie's Haitian origins style. Other ...


4

It would seem that British film The Plague of the Zombies (1966) would be the first registered example of a zombie movie depicting the affliction as a plague or sickness. However, the origin of the zombies is that movie stays very much mystical in nature. To understand this duality, it is necessary to known the historical and cultural elements on which ...


4

According to this documentary, this was first done 12 years earlier than Point Break in the 1979 James Bond film Moonraker.


3

You may be looking at a Sad Times Montage A sequence in which it is shown that, while time is passing, the protagonist is feeling sad and alone. Opposite of the Good-Times Montage. In fact, some films will juxtapose a Sad-Times Montage with a Good-Times Montage earlier in the film, only with different music. The description is very general but provides a ...


3

He wasn't known as "Cookie Monster" yet, but he did make several appearances before Sesame Street. From Cookie Monster - Wikipedia: Origin The book Jim Henson's Designs and Doodles explains Cookie Monster's origin as follows: "In 1966, Henson drew three monsters that ate cookies and appeared in a General Foods commercial that featured three ...


2

Star Trek conventions often showed blooper reels or gag reels from Star Trek: The Original Series back in the 1980s and probably even the 1970s. As I remember there were separate blooper reels for the first, second, and third seasons. Thus it is possible that they were compiled at the end of each season, and thus in 1967, 1968, and 1969. So if that ...


2

Not an answer, just an 'interesting' anecdote. Please don't vote it either way, it's just a bit of background info. Back in the 80's - before the days of YouTube or even "It'll be Alright on the Night" which was the first UK show to air out-takes and bloopers from recognised actors and broadcasters - the BBC's VT department used to edit together a gag reel ...


2

Based on the book Masks in Horror Cinema: Eyes Without Faces (by Alexandra Heller-Nicholas) and my research, here are the most probable answers: Curse of the Crimson Altar (The Crimson Cult) (1968): The first horror film where an animal mask is seen and used. However, it is not worn by a villain or a killer. It is in a dream of a character where a jury ...


2

This can probably be traced to the 1956 movie Around the World in 80 Days. There were earlier movies that had end credits rather than opening credits (Most notably Wizard of Oz in 1939), however they were simply names flashed on the screen. Around the World had an 11 minute ending credit sequence with the first (most likely the "above the line" group) ones ...


1

In 1937, the Hal Roach Studio cut together scenes from various Laurel & Hardy films as well as bloopers of actors swearing into a short called That's That. It was a gag reel for Stan Laurel's birthday. It will be included on the Laurel & Hardy BluRay collection that will be released in June, 2020.


1

Pixar, and later Disney, have used end credits to display alternate art and/ or storyboards. The first film I can find that does this is WALL-E, although in that film the end credits continue the story rather than retelling it.


1

I believe it was An Excursion to the Moon, made in 1908, it was a remake, near shot by shot, of the famous A Trip To The Moon


1

If for you a kiss on the lips is a "normal habit" then you're completely in denial. They clearly kiss each other on the lips probably as a "last kiss" and to show their love. So yes, in my opinion, Intolerance was the first gay kiss in cinema.


1

I just started watching Tombs of the Blind Dead (1972) - a Spanish-Portuguese horror film that has a very straight played "cat jump scare" scene around minute 20. I found this cliche irritating an visited TVtropes and this very question to find its origin. Other answers here say it's Aliens (1979), but this movie was made earlier. I don't think it's the ...


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