7

This is an example of Art Imitates Life but that's not the TVTrope link you need. This is the TVTropes link you deserve Object Ceiling Cling Basically, in storytelling, it's a comedic effect to have things stuck in the ceiling and maybe fall after. However, there are specific pencil references in that link: Live-Action TV An episode of Coach featured ...


7

A good candidate for the first person to do this is H.V. Kaltenborn in Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939). From Wikiquote: H.V. Kaltenborn: [Announcing on the radio] Half of official Washington is here to see democracy's finest show, the filibuster, the right to talk your head off, the American privilege of free speech in its most dramatic form. The ...


6

It is hard to say definitively, mostly because (a) much of the early film record is lost and/or incomplete and (b) because there doesn't appear to be any exhaustive directory chronicling the relative order that comic-based films were released. However, the earliest known feature film I could find based on a comic (not vice versa) is a 1926 live-action ...


5

Can this be tracked back to some specific Evil Thing with glowing red eyes that predates film? Yes, except the evil part, and not necessarily the color red. If you have a cat, when you are in low light conditions you will see that their eyes are very reflective (this is part of what makes them able to see in the almost dark). This makes the cat nigh ...


5

There are several different versions of this appearing in television, however the earliest film version that I could find was the 1968 Italian film, Danger: Diabolik. Directed by de Laurentis, and a score by Ennio Morricone, it features a criminal named Diabolik who plans large heists for his girlfriend. It was an adaptation from existing comics at the time. ...


4

From pagalparrot You will get surprised to know that the world’s first porn film was made in 1896 during the silent era of films. It was a seven-minute French film that featured a woman stripteasing in the bathroom, gets bathed, and then gets dressed again. The name of the movie was “Le Coucher de la Mariée.” From Wikipedia The original film has been ...


3

You may be looking at a Sad Times Montage A sequence in which it is shown that, while time is passing, the protagonist is feeling sad and alone. Opposite of the Good-Times Montage. In fact, some films will juxtapose a Sad-Times Montage with a Good-Times Montage earlier in the film, only with different music. The description is very general but provides a ...


3

Yes, it's done. In Telugu movie Sye (2004), there is a song Urura Urura. The main characters literally sing what is shown on wall posters, cutouts, and hoardings. (I am a Telugu speaking person.) The postures, hoardings are in Telugu and he reads the same. For English for crosschecking, see the video from 1:13 to 1:24.


3

As you increase your scope to include orangutans, with great trepidation I propose Dr Zaius from the original Planet of the Apes Zaius serves a dual role in Ape society, as Minister of Science in charge of advancing ape knowledge, and also as Chief Defender of the Faith. In the latter role, he has access to ancient scrolls and other information not given ...


3

This originates from the Blade Brake trope, which is the act of using a blade or other object, dug into the side of a building or wall to reduce your speed or halt your descent with bonus points if you don't stop immediately and leave a "skid mark"/trail of destruction. Blade Brake as a trope is a variant of Stab the Sail (although this is far less common ...


3

He wasn't known as "Cookie Monster" yet, but he did make several appearances before Sesame Street. From Cookie Monster - Wikipedia: Origin The book Jim Henson's Designs and Doodles explains Cookie Monster's origin as follows: "In 1966, Henson drew three monsters that ate cookies and appeared in a General Foods commercial that featured three crunchy ...


3

I guess what makes Arrival different from other media where this has been done is that the main character refers to future events as if they were the past. It's not just a flash forward. She's actually remembering the future. In the Westworld TV series, they often show the audience 2 different timelines and sometimes it becomes difficult to know what ...


3

No. There is a scene in They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969) where Robert, the character played by Michael Sarrazin, is seen being thrust into a jail cell by a police officer, even though he has done nothing to provoke such treatment. The audience is notified, later in the story, that Sarrazin's character would have indeed made choices that warrant his ...


2

I don't know if it fits exactly, but in Helix Season 2 (2015), The show start with two plots that we are made believed are concurrent


2

This can probably be traced to the 1956 movie Around the World in 80 Days. There were earlier movies that had end credits rather than opening credits (Most notably Wizard of Oz in 1939), however they were simply names flashed on the screen. Around the World had an 11 minute ending credit sequence with the first (most likely the "above the line" group) ones ...


1

I just started watching Tombs of the Blind Dead (1972) - a Spanish-Portuguese horror film that has a very straight played "cat jump scare" scene around minute 20. I found this cliche irritating an visited TVtropes and this very question to find its origin. Other answers here say it's Aliens (1979), but this movie was made earlier. I don't think it's the ...


1

First word fuck appeared in movies in 1963. see video proof As you can see in the video, first F word film is Vapors (1963).


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