71

There's a very simple structure that works very well. It's called a career. If you want a career in the film/TV business, it is not in your best interests to leak information. Sure, the further down the pecking order you are, the less likely you are to be trusted. A supporting artist (extra) won't even know the script for the scene they're actually filming ...


53

It's part timing, part cajoling and part luck. I don't know the specific laws for other countries, but in the UK, children under 5 can only be "at work" for a maximum of 5 hours a day, between 9.30 and 4.30. This is from the moment they arrive into costume or hair/makeup at base, not when they get to set. One child takes at minimum two, if not ...


27

I'm not really sure I should be answering this one as well ;) I can, of course, in any answer of this type, only mention things which are "already known" Late addition I just spotted the opening paragraph of the Avengers leak linked in the question. It starts… "Thanks to an extra on set" This is why 'extras' [supporting artists] have ...


25

As WC Fields would say, “Never work with children or animals”. They are unpredictable and the steal the scene. A photographer friend of mine once said that timing is everything. You can direct adults in order to get a great shot. With children and animals, they direct you. You just have to be ready to get the shot when the moment strikes. I have heard ...


21

My memory is that a number of play scenes in Kindergarten Cop (1990) with Arnold Schwarzenegger were filmed unstructured, simply with the kids left to be kids and the actors given 5 guidelines: (director) Ivan Reitman invented the five "Reitman Rules of Filmmaking" for the kids: Listen, act natural, know your character, don't look in the camera, ...


12

Tetsujin's answer is great and comprehensive but I would add about the second point in the question: "Causing disruptions in the day to day working of that public place...". In some places the authorities in charge of managing the day to day working of public spaces are very willing to make accommodations to get films filmed there. For example, ...


7

In some cases, free crowds. Once I walked into a casino and there were big signs at every entrance warning that they were shooting a movie and that by continuing past the sign you were consenting to your image being used in crowd scenes in the movie. I never saw what they were actually shooting. This was long enough ago I doubt they were CGIing the action ...


5

An example of a creative way to keep a secret, in The Dark Knight Rises, for the funeral scene, was when Christian Bale was asked to show up (even Michael Caine was surprised to see Bale on set for that scene, so it was clearly kept under wraps as long as possible) in order to keep anyone from guessing that it was Bruce Wayne's funeral. Also the name on the ...


4

It looks like he was as good as his word. According to Wikipedia's list of Orion Pictures films and its Rob Lowe filmography, Rob Lowe has appeared in only one Orion Pictures film since The Hotel New Hampshire: a 2016 thriller called Pocket Listing. However, it appears that Orion only picked up the film for distribution after it was produced by Mythmaker ...


2

It depends. Obviously different movies require different amounts of post-production. And different movies follow different schedules. For example, principle photography for Return of the King was shot as part of a gigantic block of filming the trilogy in 1999/2000 - three years before that movie's release). That said, someone has crunched the numbers. The ...


1

Yes On Netflix, the series Chelsea reached 120 episodes, while Trailer Park Boys (a continuation) had 55 episodes before Netflix picked it up and was renewed until it had 105. On Amazon, the series Selfie with Bajrangi was commissioned for 104 episodes over 2 seasons and went into syndication on the Disney channel. In 2020 Disney+Hotstar renewed it for 234 ...


1

I can think of a couple of reasons… Audience expectation. If the new Dr Who looked like the old Dr Who, complete with wobbly cardboard sets & rubber monsters, no-one would watch it. Improved video quality. I was once in the states in the 90s & saw just how truly poor the picture on a 50" NTSC TV was. We didn't have [or I had never been in the ...


1

This cost is directly related to licensing each movie. Each movie has a contract to license the movie ("terms"), which are negotiated with the exhibitor/theater on a per movie basis. The contract will specify a certain percentage of box office ticket sales which are due to the film distributor. There will also typically be a minimum charge of a few ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible