20

Several characters end up where they started out, or end up in a place that reflects their situation from the beginning of the season. Lou: Ed: Mike: Hanzee: The quote cited in the question seems to miss one of the main themes of the season, and the fact that another episode was titled "The Myth of Sisyphus": These characters are doomed to struggle ...


18

First of all, we should note that Sudanese boys coming to Fargo, is an actual incident. Check this article in The New York Times. Now, this Sudanese kid scene is shown in the episode entitled "The Heap". The basic theme in this episode is "As time goes by". Lester successfully frames his brother and the case is kind of closed after Bill stops Molly from ...


17

The TV show is just copying the disclaimer in the original movie, although the date has been changed to 2006. But, in the case of the movie, the Coen brothers just made that up as a joke: See this link from Snopes.com for more info So I think it's safe to assume that the events in the TV series are fictional as well.


11

It seems that the show was trying to portray both the warmth and approachability you describe AND the way he was perceived as somewhat superficial. Specifically addressed by Bruce Campbell in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter. HR: I love the scene with Reagan and Lou at the urinal, because that scene seems to capture both Reagan's believable empathy, ...


11

Malvo first posed this riddle to Gus in episode 4, and later in that episode Molly gave Gus a clue ... she talked about how predators created a need in the prey to differentiate between shades of green so that the prey could protect themselves. So, when Gus hearkens back to this riddle in the finale, he's essentially telling Malvo he's figured out what sort ...


10

Officially the show is 'heavily inspired by' the film. But there are many connections between the two story lines, the briefcase included. Here's a more exhaustive list of connections (spoilers): http://www.ew.com/article/2014/06/17/fargo-film-series-references-season-finale Regarding the briefcase of money, specifically, from the above link: The ...


9

According to Bustle: Much like the opening of Season 2, which features a film crew waiting for the arrival of then-actor Ronald Reagan, the opening of Season 3 is a prologue that sets up the themes of the season and features a specific homage to a popular work of fiction. The Season 2 premiere opens with two people waiting on a film set for Reagan,...


9

I believe it's from the "Lord of War" movie (alternative link for the europeans).


8

According to multiple sources (here's one of them), the neighbor Ari Ziskind, an Orthodox Jew, says "Se'irim", a Hebrew word for Demon, probably in response to Malvo's malevolence and veiled threats. Ari also says that Malvo's black eyes spell trouble, so there might be a hint of mystical Jewish intuition going on there.


8

I don't think he was actually framing his nephew as much as trying to give the police a reason to go to his brother's house. Lester probably counted on the blame falling solely on his brother once the police discovered the illegal firearm and the planted evidence.


8

From another angle, it's easier to see the first word ends in X. This is an allusion to Sioux Falls. Season 2 is a prequel to season 1 taking place in 1979 in Luverne, North Dakota, across the border from Sioux Falls, South Dakota. In it, Lou Solverson investigates a case. The thing is, future Lou already mentioned the case back in season 1, as did fellow ...


7

Wolf is a predator. I'm sure you remember the riddle Malvo asked Gus: Do you know why the human eye can see more shades of green than any other color? Malvo considered himself a predator. He valued only predators and liked changing people into them (like he did with Lester). And for the meaning of the scene here is a quote from an interview with one of ...


7

Lou and Peggy's conversation certainly carries a lot of thematic weight, and there's a lot of out-of-universe analysis to make out of it, but in the absence of an interview where a writer says "Well, what I meant was this" an answer to that analytical question would be opinion-based at best and speculative at worst. Lou's retort is well-motivated in-...


7

That would be an ice fishing drill or an Ice Auger. It's used to drill a vertical hole in thick ice to ice fish.


7

Is it possible to be related to the UFO appearance? Not really....but tangentially. Rye was standing in the middle of the road and got hit by a vehicle which knocked his shoe off from the force of the impact... it happens in real life too. Of course, the reason he was standing in the road was that he was distracted by the appearance of the UFO...but the ...


7

I personally think it is symbolic that after the previous chief of the police died in line of duty, how the new chief has run this police department into a joke. The new police chief has lots of interests in fish, one of the first things he does is to hang a huge fish trophy on his wall. It is also kind of sarcastic to show an Asian lady (in those pictures,...


6

Let's just say Lester was under the influence of his new found confidence which slightly tipped over into over confidence when he followed Malvo. After last year's events, Lester thought of himself as a changed man, who would not be pushed over or chased away. Malvo initially just tried to ignore him and this offended Lester who then followed him to prove to ...


6

Each episode of Fargo TV Series has the following included in the ending credits which states that: The characters and incidents portrayed and the names used herein are fictitious, and any similarity to the name, character or history of any person is entirely coincidental and unconditional. AKA: not a true story


6

Remember the 180 degree rule only applies WHEN breaking it results in disorienting the viewer. There are many scenarios where 'breaking' the rule does not result in disorientation, and therefore is not actually 'breaking' it. A good example is any scene taking place in a car. If you've got both your characters in the driver and passenger seat, breaking the ...


6

As can be seen during the meeting of Kansas City Mafia executives in the first episode of the season their organisation is very corporate. They have a "business plan" for the takeover of Gerhardts and present it on slides: Based on that it's obvious that they utilise not only thugs and hitmen, but also office workers. Mike's arguable promotion is a transfer ...


6

Deus Ex Machina The Fargo universe is indeed full of Deux Ex Machina (unexplained luck) occurrences. For example Lorne Malvo disappearing from Lester's basement or Stavros finding the money in the first season, or in the third season : So the UFO on this scene is probably another occurrence that allow Ed and his wife to escape. UFOs on Fargo Now about ...


6

I may have to be corrected for this but I do not believe that there is a direct plot or character link between Fargo (1996) and Fargo (TV Series) Season 2 (2015), they are only related by association through Fargo (TV Series) Season 1 (2014). With regards to plot, the first series is related to the film through Stavros Milos's discovery of the money buried ...


5

Malvo is an extremely odd character. You can say he is somewhat similar to the Joker in The Dark Knight. These are psychotic criminals without clear motives for a crime (Joker, obviously, being way ahead of the curve). There are several instances from the show where Malvo does strange things to people. Some examples : when he check in to a motel, he ...


5

After rewatching both episodes, I didn't see any definite evidence that Hanzee knew ahead of time that they were going to the Motel. Between the cabin and the hotel we only see Hanzee four times. He enters the cabin and kills Dodd, spends some time there getting a "haircut", then flees when Lou and Hank show up. Next we see him return to the store, kill the ...


5

Vulture's Matt Zoller Seitz talks about the "same/different" vibe that permeates the show in his review of the pilot episode: You could look for one-to-one correlations between the movie and the show, but as soon as you find one that feels close, series creator Noah Hawley severs the connection. The pregnant officer played by Frances McDormand at ...


5

It is confirmed in the episode Aporia (S03E09), that Emmit is the older, the two brothers being two years apart. EMMIT: My dad gave me a car, but I wanted the stamps. What 17-year-old boy wants stamps when he can have a cherry-red Corvette? But I did. And Ray, like I said, he was a chubby kid. 15 years old, never been laid, never even felt up a girl.


5

While not a direct link to the movie, there is a big wink to the movie in at least one plot strain: The first season has been the most directly connected to the events and arc of the film. Fargo's second round, however, did swipe one big chunk of the movie's plot, by masking a kidnapping victim in a burlap sack and tying him to a chair in a remote ...


4

Spoiler Alert He doesn't kill only bad people, as the elevator scene (and others) show. He saw Milos as prey to be toyed with. Malvo is certainly a psychopath, he seems to enjoy manipulating people, seeing them as only a means to an end. For example, in season 1, episode 10, he laments to Lester, of the work he put in to master his new identity as a ...


4

We can't say that the police ignored this fact. Of course they would have taken notice and known that someone else was involved. It's just that this part is not discussed in further story. If you look at the complete story from the beginning, there were a series of bizarre events which baffled the police, but the police is shown kind of helpless and clueless,...


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