47

Edited due to many comments providing advice: Deus Ex Machina doesn't originate from the (rather spectacular) video game Deus Ex. Modern meaning Nowadays, it's a simple phrase that exists in the English language and is defined as such: a character or thing that suddenly enters the story in a novel, play, movie, etc., and solves a problem that had ...


35

Why she betrayed Caleb? Ava's sole purpose is to escape from the place. So, she used Caleb with her skills programmed into her like sexuality and manipulation to escape the facility. The reason for locking up Caleb and leaving him there to die are because Caleb is the only person who's aware of the fact that she's not human. If anyone finds out that she ...


30

Ava failed the Turing test. That's your answer. It's a simple one but I don't think you'll like it so I'll explain: She failed because she did exactly what she was programmed to do, she escaped. She used every single aspect of her programming to do it. Like you said, she used sexuality, manipulation etc. etc. but she was still BOUND by the laws of her ...


23

The placement of his scars can't be purely coincidental. What is the symbolism, and significance of Caleb's scars? It's part of Garland's plan to misdirect the viewer and keep them off-balance and subvert their own expectations based on what they have seen in previous movies that explored similar subjects. There’s lots of misdirection in the film, one of ...


20

On a concrete level, Ava simply went to the place she said earlier she wanted to visit - a busy intersection - to go people watching. On a deeper level, I believe the shot of the shadows relates to the Platonic description of real vs imagined experiences, which is a theme throughout. Until Ava is out in the real world, her experiences are like shadows ...


13

The common source material is the Christian Bible, specifically the story of Adam and Eve. Eve is created from source material from the first human, Adam, and then animated. Her name translates to "the animated". In most languages as in the original (hawa) it ends on -a. The stories all are strongly related to the biblical story, they are "the story of Eve ...


13

There's no plot hole. It's explicitly laid out in the beginning of the film that the pilot isn't allowed anywhere near the place. One can easily assume he doesn't have direct contact and, as such, there's probably no reason for him to not believe who ever shows up at the designated location. Chauffeurs often take pride in asking no questions and simply ...


11

I'm not at all sure about this, but call it my theory: I think she means her version number, as in Ava 1.0, out of beta. I wish I could elaborate but there really isn't any references I can give since this is purely my personal belief.


10

According to the director, Alex Garland, the answer would be: no “I imagined it as a completely self-contained story and I still feel that way about it,” Garland said. “It has become reflexive for people to imagine this movie was made to set up a sequel and that the plan was built into the structure of the film. But it was not that way, at all.”


10

Well, there was no reason for the pilot to be alarmed. He simply flew to his boss's home when he was supposed to, in the middle of nowhere. Every order he ever received came from back home, so he'd be dazzled and easily convinced by any professional-looking person who comes from inside the very mansion he can't even get close to. She calmly says she's the ...


10

Deus ex machina is a very old theatrical plot device, where the characters of gods would be brought on stage to develop the plot. It came to mean any 'outside influence' on the plot structure, which could not have been performed by the characters themselves. Its literal meaning "God from the machine" has been reinterpreted over recent years, as the plot ...


9

In the film Nathan says to Caleb "you're pretty good [at coding]". "Pretty good" coders comment their code. As for leaving evidence of a crime, that was going to happen outside of the code anyways. The fact that she'd escape would prove that she was true AI. Any 'crime' was going to be rather irrelevant at that point.


9

Quora has a great explanation for this: I consider the possibility that Ava was referring to the singularity. But I believe she was fully aware that her proclamation "I am one" was off-putting from the perception of Caleb. She was already able to carry on conversations with the social acuity of a human as evidenced in later interactions. I believe ...


9

The relationship between Ex Machina and Deus Ex is that both are based on the same original phrase: Deus ex machina. The phrase had a specific meaning related to plays, however both the artworks in question are using its literal translation: God from the machine. Deus Ex, the video game series, has protagonists who undergo progressive cyborg augmentation. ...


9

Ava is clearly the AI. Her mechanical body parts are exposed early on and Oscar himself states that she was built by him. However, we as the audience are led to automatically assume both Caleb and Oscar are humans. Remember, we are given very little info on Caleb and Oscar's lives prior to them meeting each other. What little info is given is mainly for ...


7

It is both stated and shown that Ava is very intelligent. It seems reasonable to think that she could construct a way of charging.


7

It seems as though you answered your own questions, and that's the answer I was going to give: Caleb knew (or suspected) that Nathan had heard his conversations with Ava. If Caleb hadn't tried to get Nathan drunk that morning, Nathan would have known that Caleb ALREADY completed his plan, and he would have undone the computer code that Caleb altered.


7

The film's key message, for me, was this: Our social animal's instincts -- like sympathy for Ava, and attraction to Ava -- are terrible guides for how to understand the motives and the potential of AI. (And they are already problematic guides for other humans.) We interact towards the expectations of an instinctively-defined social contract. But when the ...


6

I believe the reason why Ava trapped Caleb is because she's not a sci-fi robotic terminator. She doesn't possess immense strength, speed, etc. She knows that every person is a risk to her freedom. She didn't imprison Caleb out of malice. If anything, it was out of distrust for what Caleb could do to her. The only reason she asked him to stay rather than ...


6

I don't think there's a completely objective answer to this short of the writer coming forward and laying out their thought process for us. My completely personal opinion on this, however is that the story ended the way it ended as that was the story arch that we were on. Nathan sets it up earlier in the film as he discusses the future of AI with Caleb ...


6

Yes, to avoid the locks being hackable via the network. A centralized system using biometrics or other methods could potentially be vulnerable to an AI -- or inquisitive visiting programmer -- that got access to the network. The keycards would simply be high-tech keys with access individually coded into each of the locks. Plus, it's entirely possible ...


4

you could see that he is writing in a language not too different than C++ or Swift. It's Python, and it annoyed me at first that they were just showing some irrelevant "Hello world" code on the screen, when all the other technical details in the script were pretty plausible. But it turns out there's more to it than just being irrelevant to the plot; it's ...


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