147

No this is not a mistake. It's just a British form of derogatory humour to continue to refer to the US as "the Colonies". It's not something that would be used in everyday speech to refer to America but if the speaker wanted to imply that the US was in some way "lesser" they would put it down by using the term...as in former colonies, as though the War of ...


12

I'm not sure exactly what your question is. In both versions (if it was cut for the UK) it seems pretty clear that he uses a Surface, although the US version makes more of a big deal out of it. The US version seems like it would be canon, as the show is produced for CBS and broadcast in the US first. The UK cut is an alteration for a different audience. As ...


4

I speak Russian a little and I was hoping that I would be able to translate it. Your source didn't work for me, so I found a different one and in this version the conversation is subtitled. Krasnov's quotes Fyodor Dostoyevsky's short story Bobok: From Somebody's Diary Всех умней, по-моему, тот, кто хоть раз в месяц самого себя дураком назовет (...) In ...


4

Sherlock's hatred of his father is explained in Elementary Season 4, Episode 14 titled "Who Is That Masked Man". During that episode as Sherlock is investigating the death of Sabine he reveals to Joan that he blames his father for his mother's death. His father threw her out and due to prenuptial agreement she was living in a small rundown house that ...


3

Was it built in reality for the show? Yes. But not as a whole complete single system. Prologue Creative Director Simon Clowes employs a Rube Goldberg contraption to represent the manic detective’s unorthodox, sometimes convoluted and often aggressive approach to crime solving. Interview with Simon Clowes on artofthetitle, discussed how they made the ...


3

I think you'll have to go with 'suspension of disbelief', for a couple of reasons... I also think this is alluded to in the original quote... Like the mind of the great detective, the invention works at a dizzying pace, with only parts of it revealed while others remain a mystery. Images all screenshot from the youtube link The 'bullet', as far as I ...


3

The dialogue you're looking for is: influence peddler par excellence In fact, it's quoted in the Sherlock Holmes wiki. He is described as an international consultant, and an "influence peddler par excellence".


3

I am not aware of specific cult followings that these shows draw from, but the lore and allure of serial killers and their followers has been a long established fact. Some of the more famous serial killers that have cults include (But are not limited to): Charles Manson - The Manson Family were a bunch of women that followed him as a guru, and whom he sent ...


3

There are copycat crimes: A copycat crime is a criminal act that is modelled or inspired by a previous crime that has been reported in the media or described in fiction. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copycat_crime And: Copycat killers are a very common plot twist in police dramas, movies, and mystery novels where the plot involves serial killings....


1

I believe the Narwhal's explanation for the lemurs: his daughter saves endangered animals and runs a shelter for them. While eccentric, it didn't seem outside the bounds of reality for a TV show. I forget exactly how it came out, but Moriarty arranged for the clue to keep the game with Holmes going.


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