31

It doesn't appear to be discussed in the movie. In the book the film is based on, All You Need is Kill, he has 160 iterations. There's an interesting thread over at IMDB you might want to peruse, where people have argued everything from 100 days to over 1000 days, to over 100 years! There isn't any common consensus on that thread (or indeed across the ...


27

It is explained in the novel. Eclipse Magazine: ... although the invasion originates from another star system, the actual aliens are terraforming creatures who have emerged from the sea after coming in contact with starfish and frogs. Their very nature can change their environment to match that of their creators’ planet. Staffer's Book Review: ....


26

I don't think we should interpret Rita's response to mean she tried using sex to get the ability back after she had lost it. Instead, I think Rita tried to transfer the ability from herself to the person she was in love with during her cycle at Verdun. (i.e. while she still had the ability.) She watched that person die ~300 times, and tried everything she ...


26

She states in the movie that after she received a blood transfusion she could feel the ability had left her. Cage also notes this when he wakes up in a military hospital after a botched attempt to retrieve the transponder prototype, as the result of a blood transfusion. As such, it would seem the ability is something you can feel, and thus you can tell when ...


17

The suits in the movie are battery powered. Rita knew Cage was going to die so he wouldn't need it. So she just took it for herself (in case she runs out of power). Edit: Not an official source but I was able to find this article on TechCrunch. Battery life was also a critical concern. Liman suggested that in the movie, world battery technology has ...


16

Possibly because the effect of resetting caused by an omega is bigger than the effect caused by an alpha. In the original explanation of the time resetting effect Cage is told that the effect is only triggered by the blood of an alpha when it is killed. Alphas are very rare (like every 1 in 6 million creatures are of this leadership caste). When they die it ...


15

Rita Vrataski (Emily's character) and Cage both state the same thing. They simply felt it gone. Some senses, feelings, or states can be felt intuitively. Like being drunk or a hang over, you just know when it's gone. The Alpha blood must impart a feeling like that as part of it's power. As Full Metal explains to Cage thinly rule: Rita: Now listen ...


14

At the end Cage was not in the camp as a trainee or deserter, but as a major. When he awoke in the helicopter after killing the Omega, the time was still before his encounter with General Brigham. So at this time he still had his complete military status as Major Cage, since there was no need to go into the field anymore and thus no need to desert at all. ...


14

There is a point in the movie where Emily Blunt's character, Rita, speculates that Humans may be the first species to be able to effectively fight back against this alien, because of how we can absorb the time traveling ability when exposed to their blood. Both Rita and Cage are, at different points in time, exposed to the blood of an alpha, and gain the ...


13

Why is the Omega not Alive after the restart loop? The Omega (Core) is the "Time Machine" that allows for Time Travel! How could a dead Omega restart the time loop again? IT CANNOT. If the Alpha is killed, the Omega simply restarts the day. If the Omega is killed, well... That's it. Restarting of the day cannot be done because the thing that actually did ...


12

You're not the first person on the web to ask this, and with good reason! Plenty of movie reviews have drawn attention to the fact that the release date coincides with D-Day, and whilst it's probable this was factored in by its marketing department, it's unlikely or downright problematic for the film's promotional material to draw attention to this as ...


12

my guess is that Cage usually wakes up to the last moment where he regained consciousness. Since he lost consciousness when he was tasered, that's where he wakes up. Now, when Omega is killed, the war is over, so Cage would never have met with the General, and therefore never would have been tasered and lose consciousness. In this situation, the last ...


12

Movie: Main protagonist's name is Cage Book: Main protagonist's name is Keiji Movie: Mimics are comprised of the Omega and the Alphas Book: Mimics are comprised of the Nexus and Antennae Movie: Killing an Alpha causes the time loop to reset Book : Killing either the Nexus or the Antennae can cause the time loop to reset Movie: Only Cage is a looper, Rita ...


10

After thinking over the movie more, I am providing a second answer that is not necessarily contrary to my other answer. The strongest evidence that Cage does retain the ability to loop is his final loop itself (at end of movie, when he wakes up in the helicopter near Big Ben). Clearly his looping ability has been restored, and there is nothing in the movie ...


10

There is no relationship between Edge of Tomorrow and Scientology other than Tom Cruise's performance. The film is based on a Japanese novel/manga called All You Need Is Kill. Some sites claim that there is a correlation between Scientological dogma and the plot: One more thing: if I didn't know any better, I might read Edge of Tomorrow as Cruise's ...


9

I have just rewatched the scene and it doesn't look like it's a part of some elaborate plan. Seconds before the conversation from the OP's question takes place, Cage seems to hook himself as well (as the others do the same). However, the first hit at the ship blows him out of his strap (and kills Kimmel). Here, I made a clip of that part: Edge of Tomorrow: ...


9

At the beginning, he was asked to come to General Brigham's office. The General wanted Cage to show the war from the front ... from where the action was. Then Cage refused and then tried to blackmail the General. Cage thinks he's getting his way as he's walking out the building, but the General is just lining him up for failure as he has the guards take him ...


9

If you noticed the repeated events on the beach head, loop after loop, we never see the Alpha again. The Alpha cage killed stays dead on the following loops. Later on, when Cage is lured into a trap by the false vision, another Alpha is there, and they attempt to keep Cage alive, or atleast drain his blood. We are told that Cage absorbed the first Alphas ...


9

On the short run, maybe if he'd just deserted before the battle and after the briefing. On the long run not at all anyway. So what would have happened if Cage had agreed to Brigham's orders? He would have accompanied the infantry troops as a live war correspondent with his film-team directly on the battlefield. This might have given him a little more safety ...


8

As the movie is not on DVD or anything similar yet, I cannot link to proof of this answer. I saw the movie twice and they never said she killed a hundred. They always said hundreds of kills. You may have not heard the plural "s" in the theater, but I assure you, it's there. From the beginning she is credited with "hundreds" of kills. Sorry it's not possible ...


8

According to this interview, it was more about attitude than location: Tom also told me that Christopher McQuarrie wrote Master Sergeant Farrell with you in mind. Yeah, Chris came in, and me and Doug [Liman] and Chris kind of worked that out. There was a thing where we were going to make him from Texas, but then we kind of made him this Kentucky ...


8

The conversation actually goes like this: Cruise: "Listen, man. I could hurt someone with this..." Soldier: "Not with the safety on. you won't." Cruise: "Wait. Where's the safety?" Soldier: "Exactly." It's clear from the full dialogue that the "Exactly" gag centers around the fact that Cruise's character doesn't know ...


7

You think that a large deployment of troops would somehow be immune from the black market abundance of illicit material? Even in real life, drugs, alcohol, and illicit materials are abundant in field ops. It would not be unheard of or even unexpected for soldiers to have access to alcohol. Most of the soldiers at the base would be there voluntarily, and ...


6

We are constantly told that Cage has become the Alpha. At no point in the loops, do we see the Alpha on the beach again. Further more, when Cage kills the Omega, absorbing it's blood and power, the Omega does not survive the reset. So we can logically assume that that Alpha didn't survive it either. Cage could not fight that same Alpha as it no longer ...


5

Short answer: we don't know. First of all, the answers to the question that you mention are inconclusive. So, did the blood give Cage the ability, or did it just include him in the one last reset dome by dying Omega (maybe like a post-mortem tick)? Personally, I believe that this was not thought through by the film makers, and only serves the purpose of ...


5

I think the events and symbolism of the movie suggest that, at the end of the film, Cage does not have the time-looping ability, or at least does not need it. The loops have served their purpose: he has matured into a responsible, loving adult. Notice how the movie comments on the human maturity process: At beginning of movie, Cage is immature and selfish....


5

How about this theory? I think it's a bit different to and might be hard to understand, based on how we perceive the story as a linear movie: After watching the movie, I still wondered how one or more entities would be able to somehow alter time in the whole universe to create the resets. A bit like The Butterfly Effect? Nah, didn't really make any sense to ...


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