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65

Marvel Studios, LLC (originally known as Marvel Films from 1993 to 1996) is an American film studio that is a subsidiary of The Walt Disney Studios, a division of The Walt Disney Company. As Wikipedia states, Marvel Studios is a film studio, similarly like The Walt Disney Studios, both of which are owned by the Walt Disney Company. These studios produce ...


59

Yes, Disney moved away from hand-drawn animation In a 2013 interview with the Guardian, chief executive Bob Iger said that none of its animation companies are working in the traditional 2D format, and there are no current plans to do so again. Speaking at an annual shareholder's meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, on Wednesday, chief executive Bob Iger revealed ...


55

I am answering subjectively here, but I think it really comes down to evoking even more sympathy for the main characters. Not only do they often have to battle difficult circumstances (i.e. being an outcast or something similar), but they also have to deal with being alone in the world. All of this creates genuine sympathy for the protagonists. This Daily ...


50

According to this article, Movies Disney will acquire following movie franchises from Fox. X-Men movies Fantastic Four movies Star Wars (the rights to the original and prequel trilogies) Deadpool series Avatar series Planet of the Apes series It will also acquire some of the older films. Night at the Museum films Home Alone films Doctor Dolittle films ...


42

To make the Mickey symbol more recognizable, the more authentic depiction was abandoned. From Wikipedia: Ub Iwerks designed Mickey's body out of circles in order to make the character simple to animate. Disney employees John Hench and Marc Davis believed that this design was part of Mickey's success as it made him more dynamic and appealing to audiences. ...


39

There is no official word from Disney, but I can say these two things for facts: Elsa is a Queen. So, making her a Princess would be almost impossible. Elsa and Anna represent 25% of all Disney merchandising sales. Twenty five percent. Keeping them separate from all other Disney Princesses is probably the best move financially.


36

Its not just the animated movies; Disney corporation also made a lot of live action films that have this pattern: A family is damaged. A child has an adventure as a result. During the adventure the child becomes more like an adult, taking responsibility for themselves and others, and ultimately becomes a hero. The family is restored, or a new family is ...


36

The Walt Disney Company owns a huge number of brands. One of their brands, and one of the most famous and valuable of them, happens to share a name with the company that owns it, but that doesn't matter much. What matters more is that it is associated in the minds of consumers with a certain kind of "safe" entertainment that won't bore young kids or ...


35

Being a Disney Princess is not just a matter of being a princess from a Disney property, it's a question of marketing. The collection of Disney Princesses is used together in other materials, things like direct-to-video releases, books, games, etc. There's an article on a Disney Wikia that has some more details, but that's the gist of it. Frozen was such a ...


24

The earliest Disney animated movie I can find is Sleeping Beauty, from 1959, which shows the Dragon being slain by a sword, showing some blood. I found this picture, I see no reason why this picture is not genuine... In live action movies, in 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (1954), Captain Nemo (played by James Mason) is shot whilst boarding the Nautilus. He ...


18

According to Wiki: A113 (sometimes A-113 or A1-13) is an inside joke, an Easter egg in animated films created by alumni of California Institute of the Arts, referring to the classroom used by graphic design and character animation students including John Lasseter and Brad Bird. You can see John Lasseter explaining it here: ...


18

No, Disney does not produce nor is making any traditional hand drawn animation. There is probably a good reason for this in Disney's eyes. Traditional hand animation is a lot of work. It's very time consuming and can't be changed easily late in production like CGI can and is expensive because of that. To give a demonstration, there is a nice video about ...


17

I would venture to guess that it's due to marketing. Being a princess is a very common fantasy among young girls that probably predates the Disney Princesses franchise. The combination of romance and beautiful dresses has a big appeal to that demographic. On the flip side we have the male counterpart: the prince. For the young girl demographic the prince's ...


13

According to the Logos wiki, In 2006, Walt Disney Pictures started using a new intro with a new CGI animation with a very complex depiction of the Sleepy Beauty Castle and its surroundings. It was a clear change from the old blue and white intro with its stylized castle and 2D animation. The new intro was first used on Pirates of the Caribbean:...


13

The "Disney Princess™" is a relatively recent innovation in Disney's branding, dating back only to 2000 or so: The rise of the Disney princesses reads like a fairy tale itself, with Andy Mooney, a former Nike executive, playing the part of prince, riding into the company on a metaphoric white horse in January 2000 to save a consumer-products division ...


12

Although other people have answered the question on full hand drawn films very well, a notable recent relevant fact is that Maui's tattoos in Moana were, in fact, hand drawn animation superimposed on the CG film. From the Hollywood Reporter article "How 'Moana's' Animators Brought a Tattoo to Life": "Somewhere in the process, Mini Maui started to emerge, ...


11

It's already been pointed out that not all Disney films include the death of a parent, but there are indeed a few that does and the reason for that, I believe, is because of the targeted audience. Children. For most children, parents are thought of as gods. Not in the sense that they are always respected and obeyed (unfortunately), but in the sense that ...


11

When writing for children, it is quite common (regardless of authorship or medium) to minimize the role of parents in the story. Many non-Disney or pre-Disney children's stories find a good way of reducing or removing the role of parents. Here are some prominent examples from non-Disney stories: The Chronicles of Naria - despite having children from many ...


11

Seeing that you're after short ones as well, The Winged Scourge from 1943 (which stars the 7 Dwarves) not only features blood graphically and in close-up, it's practically about it, since it's an educational short about the danger of mosquitos. Here's a still frame from it with a mosquito drinking blood:


11

They don't. Here is a list of "official Disney villains" from Wikipedia: Amos Slade (The Fox and the Hound) Big Bad Wolf (Three Little Pigs) Captain Hook (Peter Pan) Chernabog (Fantasia) Cruella de Vil (One Hundred and One Dalmatians) Doctor Facilier (The Princess and the Frog) Edgar Balthazar (The Aristocats) Frollo (The Hunchback of Notre Dame) Gaston (...


10

No According to Forbes: Part of Disney’s acquisition is set to include the purchase of 20th Century Fox Television. This is not the same thing as Disney purchasing the Fox network, which is not part of the deal. What Disney is potentially buying is every show Fox produces, including The Simpsons, Family Guy, The Gifted, Empire and off-network shows ...


9

Disney had, in 1971, acquired the rights to Lloyd Alexander's "The Chronicles of Prydain". The movie, which took over twelve years to make, is loosely based upon the first two books ("The Book of Three" and "The Black Cauldron"). The Chronicles, in turn, are loosely based on the mythology of ancient Wales, a collection of tales known as the Mabinogion. ...


8

I've found no references about this anywhere online, so I'm going to say no, they are not (deliberate) references. There are plenty of Easter Eggs that Disney, and Pixar in particular, are famous for. For an example of these, see this link. However, no member of the production team for any of these films has made any comment about observations like yours, ...


8

TL;DR: At least 6, probably 7, and possibly as many as 9. Going through the official list of Disney Princesses, from the top: Snow White: Yes. As you stated, she's 14 (15 by the end of the story) and according to production notes, Prince Florian is intended to be 18. Cinderella: Unknown. She's 19, older than most Disney Princesses, but I can't find an age ...


7

This is conjecture on my part, but I believe these are idealizations of other attractions at the various Disney theme parks. (Trying to find a source to back me up.) The train is the Disneyland Railroad and the ship is the Sailing Ship Columbia


7

Note: I am ignoring movies where the main plot revolves around the main character reconnecting with their parent; because these movies are inherently focused on the relationship between the child and parent. This is about movies where the plot occurs independently (the vast majority of movies), where the parental relationship is optional plotwise but ...


7

Disney isn't the most original company on earth, especially when it comes to story telling and are pretty lazy Disney Film Sources At the above link one can peruse the fairy tales that Disney has used for their films, a few of them being: Film - Source - Author, Year of Death Snow White - Snow White, Brothers Grimm, German, died in 1859/1863 ...


6

Because Netflix is better suited for the type of show that Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron fist want to be. More adult than would fly on broadcast channels like ABC, and not suited for Disney's branded channels (cartoon and teen programming). And Netflix offered substantial benefits that the traditional broadcast model did not Straight from the ...


6

Disney takes traditional fairy tales, adapts to the modern audience, then releases them. If you actually research into their original versions, they are extremely gruesome, easily M rated, and will NEVER be for teenagers. This is simply Disney doing what it has always been doing; producing product suitable for the general audience.


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