10

The reference is to the original movie Clash of the Titans from 1981. The owl has a more prominent role in that movie. This is just a "cameo" to give the audience a chuckle. Edit: Its name is Bubo ... I never knew it had a name, but the wiki page explains it all!


8

Here is what they actually said: Your journey does not end well. Fate has spoken. You will die, son of Zeus! Written as history. You will die. The obvious question is: what is his journey? It may very well extend beyond the movie and, as we know today, it did: we had a sequel. So, the propecy may still be true, but are yet to see it fulfilled (...


5

Louis Leterrier was a huge fan of the original film, but, as he put it: I watched the original again. I went to a shop and bought the DVD and the stuff I love was still there. But it’s funny: memory is the best editor. So it was like, Oh, really? This was in it? It’s that simple? He goes on a journey because he fell in love with her? Really? I felt like ...


5

Most of the elements are indeed taken from Greek Mythology however they've been put together in a different manner. I'll try to outline a few changes: Perseus did indeed kill Medusa and save Andromeda, however in the myth it was a sea monster sent by Poseidon not Hades, it was indeed based around the city of Argos. Medusa was actually one of three Gorgon ...


5

The movies are loosely based on Greek Mythology. There are a lot of faux pas in the movies which makes them fun to watch, but not accurate to the mythology. Here are a couple of sites which explains some of the issues: Mythtakes About the Movies When Hollywood Gets in the Way of a Perfectly Good Myth Even Hollywood movies based on true events are just "...


3

His name is Prokopion and was played by Luke Treadaway in the 2010 version. He was not being commanded by Hades, but he was influenced by him in the fact that he believed in him as others do Zeus. As stated by the Clash of the Titans Wiki: Prokopion is the leader of the cult of Hades in Argos, and leads the cities' citizens to sacrificing Andromeda to ...


3

Zeus explains this himself, in the final scene of the movie: But now the world knows a man can stop him [Hades]. Of course, you had some help. A sword, the Pegasus... I wanted men to worship us again, but I didn't want it to cost me a son. So, he simply didn't want his son Perseus to die. It think Zeus has also some regrets, and feels partly ...


3

I can think of two reasons: He needs humans' fear, as he admitted to "have only learned to live on their fear" (while Zeus need their love), so the short term reason is to get as much of their fear as possible. As for the long term reason, he is plotting against Zeus, but is not yet strong enough (I mentioned that here), so he needs the pretense of ...


2

In the original Clash of the Titans, Zeus demands that Athena help Perseus by giving him her super intelligent owl. She refuses, and instead has Hephestus, god of the smith and technology, make one. This mechanical, almost steam punk owl then helps throughout the movie, like a less cursing ancient Greek R2D2. Consider the similarities of the two movies, ...


1

The Titans of the title are not the literal Titans of Greek mythology (giants born of Uranus and Gaea). The term as used is the generic 'titan,' meaning "one that is gigantic in size or power." The Stygian witches in the film refer to the Kraken and Medusa as titans.


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