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I know I teased this as a comment, but the answer really is disappointing… They used CGI to mask the transitions. After comments This doesn't mean it wasn't clever or a lot of hard work by some amazing artists, merely that these days we're quite used to half of humanity vanishing, worlds colliding, or a woman pushing a space ship across galaxies. Mundane ...


12

This has so far proven to be a long and not entirely fruitful search. The generic answer to "what lens is it?" is .. it's a wide-angle lens, very wide - a type known as a fish-eye. Precisely which one may have to remain speculation. There appears to be a discrepancy in recollection even amongst people who were there at the time. As to the far broader ...


8

Without even examining the scene in microscopic detail, it's extremely unlikely that is composited from a single multi-camera take, even ignoring the cut-aways which could have been done at any time. Here's the link to the reference YouTube video the OP's linked Quora article refers to, if we need timings. Closer examination ...


7

You don't see a reflection. What you see is an actor coming towards the camera. The HAL lense and light reflexes are added from a different layer. In Odyssey Kubrick used a technique called "Front Screen Projection" A technology that uses projecting a pre-recorded movie on a very reflective material (Scotchlite by 3M in the case of 2001:SO) using a one ...


6

In the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey they used a Fairchild-Curtis custom fisheye lens, as seen on these pictures. Using a fisheye lens creates this specific distorted kind of image.


4

There's a lighting mis-match, but I think it's 'expected' for the shot. I don't think it's rear projection. It's certainly not a 'backdrop' as a boat sails across it at one point. In this wide you can see the sun is high & behind the house - look at the tree. Most of the garden is shaded by the house, and probably a couple of big flags so we don't see ...


4

Both displays are a valid 7-segment display standards, it is up to the equipment manufacturer to implement them. Typical 7 segment display looks like this: Each of the elements can be highlighted, providing the display of the 0-9 numbers (as well as some letters). It is mostly up to a whoever is building the display screen, will he put a "tail" on ...


4

There is formal education. And, there is informal education. You would have to have an education in order to make a film like Gravity. It would not necessarily have to be a college/university education. In order to have the ability to make such a film, you would have to acquire the proper education, training, coaching, etc., along with a bit of natural ...


3

I haven't seen the movie, only the trailer, so I can't fully relate to the plot and therefore this is going to be more general than if I could relate the shot usage directly to the storyline. There are two types of wide angle I see in use, to similar but not identical effect. The director is using both rectilinear and fish-eye lenses (or possibly a zoom that'...


3

For the Blu-ray versions they might have applied various amounts of blur effects (smoothing out of grain) or sophisticated noise removal algorithms on the scan results. Moreover it is likely that they put more effort in digitizing movies which promised (in their eyes) higher revenue. So that's why decades-long classics might be prioritized over more recent ...


2

Short Answer - Moviecam compact. This camera debuted in 1990 and was small, handy camera. Film (on which movie are recorded) have different grain. Usually bigger grain (noise) is cheaper and it's later smoothed out (mostly seen in TV productions). Smoothed, for example, using different lenses. But the new camera wasn't so acomodated in lenses like a Mitchell ...


2

You should be able to see whether or not the camera effects are real: real camera shake changes the point of view, which will be obvious through parallax, whereas in post-production the image is completely flat, and will only shake in its entirety, without signs of parallax. Watching the well-known bar fight+ from the first movie, and skipping frames ...


2

I would add one more term to the initial confusion: I would say that in the eyes of the audience, three terms are interchangeable, tracking, travelling & following. All simply imply that the camera stays with the subject as the subject moves. I would claim that, of these three, only 'travelling' implies that the camera physically moves along with the ...


1

According to the BFI: Like Bernardo Bertolucci, Pasolini began under the influence of classic Italian neorealism. Pasolini’s first film, Accattone (1961) – often cited as the last neorealist film – returns to the petty criminal underworld of the Roman ‘borgate’ (suburbs) that he explored in his previous novels. However, despite sharing certain superficial ...


1

Nowadays CGI would be used for a scene like this (see Mirror shot without camera reflection in "Velvet Buzzsaw"). CGI Lens shot: But since that technique was most likely not available at the time and might also not have been a great fit for Kubricks artistic approach, there must be a practical solution at works here. Other movies have done ...


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