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85

According to this site: In the early days of film cameras were hand cranked, which caused inconsistencies from movie to movie. Even further still, projection houses would speed up frame rates of movies to get that one extra projection at the end of the day. It wouldn’t be until 1929, with the introduction of the optical sound track, that the standard of ...


71

To answer this, let's take a quick look at Merriam-Webster's definition of "art", specifically the section on synonyms: ART, SKILL, CUNNING, ARTIFICE, CRAFT mean the faculty of executing well what one has devised. If we look at the art of foleying—for this is what we're talking about—it's sort of interesting to note that it's always been at least as much a ...


62

Monty Python's Flying Circus did this. According to TV Tropes: Credits Gag: In addition to many Creative Closing Credits, the placement of the credits in the show's sequence was a gag in itself. Of particular note is the episode "The Golden Age of Ballooning", where the closing credits ran about halfway through the show. The next episode, "...


36

I believe the notorious film Irréversible does this as part of its "reverse chronology" gimmick. The credits roll right at the very beginning, reversed so they scroll from top-to-bottom instead of bottom-to-top. Even though it doesn't count, as it's not a movie or TV show, I feel obliged to mention Donkey Kong Country. You defeat King K. Rool, a fake set of ...


23

They did catch on for big budget "important" movies during the last millennium, but for some reason fell out of fashion decades ago. In fact I might own one or two old movie programs or programmes. A roadshow theatrical release (known also as reserved seat engagement) was a term in the motion picture industry for a practice in which a film opened in a ...


20

As far as the high-pitched noise goes, you might want to think about what's being shown. The sound you're hearing is (supposed to be) not the sound of the gun itself, but the sound of the bullet ricocheting off a surface. In your For your eyes only clip, the surfaces are entirely concrete and metal, and it's reasonable to expect ricochets. In Casino Royale, ...


11

Movie serials had been recapping their earlier stories with crawls at least since the 1920s. (Serials in the 1910s were usually series with recurring characters but not cliff-hanger endings.) Here's an example of The Woman in Grey (1920) that has the text crawl up the screen to recap the previous episode. It does not recede into the distance like the Star ...


9

Where did people watch movie trailers? Before the internet, there were movie theaters, broadcast TV, and cable TV. Before cable TV there were movie theaters and broadcast TV. Before broadcast TV there were movie theaters. Before movie theaters there was no place to watch trailers that were not made to advertise movies that were not made.


8

The 30 Rock series finale was longer than most episodes and had the start of a early credit roll (just the "Lorne Michaels" part) before Liz quickly brought the show back to finish up the finale.


8

The facts are that the lowest framerate that can be used to make the pictures move is 16 FPS but the more, the better and smoother the movie gets. Thomas Edison believed that the optimal framerate should be 46 FPS, however, the cameras and projectors were not that fast and the film on which the movies were shot was expensive, to 46 FPS was too much. Most ...


7

The 1999 comedy Man on the Moon starts with the main character saying that the film isn't very good and that he has cut out all of the baloney. In fact, he says, this is the end of the movie. The credits then roll. Then the screen fades to black. See


6

Pressbooks were intended for theater owners to publicize a film. Movie patrons never got to see them, except for the ads that appeared in newspapers and magazines. Movie theaters had plenty of programs in the silent era and classic era. They were just different from "legitimate" theater playbills. I have a lot of these on my website at the Silent Film ...


5

There are several different versions of this appearing in television, however the earliest film version that I could find was the 1968 Italian film, Danger: Diabolik. Directed by de Laurentis, and a score by Ennio Morricone, it features a criminal named Diabolik who plans large heists for his girlfriend. It was an adaptation from existing comics at the time. ...


4

In the Garry Marshall comedy Young Doctors in Love (1982), the main character's love interest appears to be dying or dead. The main character is walking away sadly, alone, and the credits start rolling up from the bottom of the screen. The main character looks at the camera and says, "No, not now." The credits reverse direction and scroll back off the ...


4

Neon Genesis Evangelion: The End of Evangelion was created as an alternative version of the two last episodes of the TV series, so they put the credits at the middle to presumably emphasize this fact. According to Wikipedia, the episodic version of the film includes two endings, one for each episode, and even a next-episode-preview section in the first one. ...


3

It may be impossible to answer this question for the mockbuster industry as a whole from outside the industry, without a reliable way to count profits made outside a box office. However, one mockbuster-heavy studio, The Asylum, has released some numbers. According to GQ, their films normally cost ~500,000 dollars to make and turn 125,000 to 250,000 in profit....


3

Most of what @BCdotWEB posted in their answer is correct, although I've never heard of the even frame rate requirement before. 16-18 fps was used a lot in the 1910s, but by the late 1920s, most cameramen were filming around 24 fps if not higher. Of course slower rates were always used for comic effect in chase scenes. Everything that you ever wanted to ...


2

This kind of acting/behavior isn't limited to "older" films. When I first read this question I immediately thought of Alonzo's death from Training Day. Granted, the movie is from 2001, but still, it's more modern than not. And the flailing about actually has a trope dedicated to it, called the Multiple Gunshot Death: ...


2

Liza, the Fox-Fairy (2015) might be an example. Although the running time after the fake end credits is not substantial (only slightly more than two minutes), it is not an after-credits bonus scene, but part of the movie. The movie seems to end in a cliffhanger, the frame freezes, and the credits start to roll, with a corresponding music. Then the credits ...


2

Jan Kounen's 99 francs includes a fake credit sequence in the final quarter of the movie. The movie features two alternative endings of sorts. After the first ending plays out, the credits start to roll, but after a while, the protagonist interjects and forces the movie to continue, partially undoing some of what was shown before. This is very much in tone ...


2

The French film Mais qui a tué Pamela Rose ? (2003) does this too. The credits roll for no particular reason, and the film restart few seconds later, like nothing happened.


1

While it isn't an epic long film, there is a 16 second video on youtube that documents the changes in the skyline of Shijnuku (One of the wards of Tokyo, Japan) over a 35 year period. The video itself is basically stitched together photographs over a period of 35 years from the same spot. The longest capture from space documents two orbits of the ISS around ...


1

This should still qualify - there was a Seinfeld episode which was filmed in reverse order so the ending credits actually appeared in the first scene. This doesn't violate what you wrote when you said "The credits should roll during the film, not at the beginning." because this was technically the END of the episode.


1

This question is good, and the posted answers are good, but looking at this from a far higher level you need to realize something: A movie is make-believe and sound effects and special effects are never “realistic” as much as they are artistically believable. So yes, in the past films looked, sounded and were acted in “clunky” ways compared to modern films....


1

First word fuck appeared in movies in 1963. see video proof As you can see in the video, first F word film is Vapors (1963).


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