14

In-movie explanation: 1 Bane was reportedly born and raised in the Pit, a hellish prison located within a Middle Eastern country. He came to regard the prison as a home, a place where he learned "the truth about despair." From Bane himself: "It's based on a guy named Bartley Gorman," he told us. (So, not Mr. Belevedere?) "He's the king of the ...


8

No, I don't think that he is of Indian descent. The actual location for a scene does not conclusively reveal the actual location of the pit in the movie. Ra's mentions that it (pit) was a hellish prison in a Middle Eastern country, but not the specific name. It could have been India, but it could very well have been Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq .. you get the ...


8

As the other excellent answers have shown the movies are rich of various overarching themes, be they political or philosophical, about a hero or his city. But on a very personal level they are about a man, in particular Bruce Wayne's struggle to cope with the tragedy he experienced as a child and to overcome the resulting grief, fear and anger that ...


5

Yes, the ending of Inception is open to viewer's interpretation. Check this interview by Chris Nolan. About the open ending Nolan says that I've always believed that if you make a film with ambiguity, it needs to be based on a true interpretation. If it's not, then it will contradict itself, or it will be somehow insubstantial and end up making the ...


4

I'd say probably not. In fact, according to this interview I'd say he sees them as two sides to the same coin: "I've also met enough magicians now to know there's a certain amount of truth to the way we've portrayed the rivalries and conflicts that can happen between them. Obviously, we've exaggerated it hugely for dramatic effect, but at the core ...


3

I think it is done not because he can't reach us through the story, but because he wants to amplify the moment, emotion and feeling you get as a viewer. As you said story itself is good enough to make you feel those emotions but he wants you to feel them with higher intensity so he's using that music and buzz to make those moments and feelings even stronger....


3

The message is straight forward and twofold: No matter how bad things are, a single person or single idea can make a difference. This contrasts with most heroes (e.g. Superman) which follows a basic religious story (omnipotent being arrives and looks over lowly mankind, protecting us from ourselves). In Batman the symbol is the thing, and it is bigger ...


2

Because: One of the worst things that can happen to a movie franchise, especially a really good one, is over-milking. Some directors in Hollywood care about story, not just money (shocking, I know). Nolan is one of those directors. Nolan had a complete storyline for it and had a set ending. Fun fact: Nolan actually had wanted to end it after Begins and ...


2

As from a Christopher Nolan interview, he tried to make the viewers view the story in two different ways. The black and white is what we see from outside. We see Leonard talking to an unknown person. Do we hear what the other person is taking, or see him while the other person is taking in reality? No. So we hear only Leonard, see only Leonard. We move ...


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