21

That is just a music video of a narcocorrido song explaining that Heisenberg now has a reputation in Mexico and to show how the cartel feels about Heisenberg. If you look closely, the Heisenberg shown isn't even Walter White, but a younger person. The cartel don't know him, their only reference is the drawing.


9

The importance of the scene in relation to El Camino is that it's Jesse finding closure with his old (Breaking Bad) life. It's not just Walt, we also see memories of Mike and Jane. The scene very much highlights a part of Walt's character that defined Jesse's interaction with him, in a way that Jesse now retroactively think he should've seen the red flags. ...


9

As mentioned in the episode's Wikia page: Jesse prepares coffee and slips some sleeping pills into Walt's cup in an effort to force him to get some much-needed sleep. "Let the traps do the work," he says.


9

I would attribute it to a little bit of both reasons you give and a dash of "the ends justify the means". If you are no longer dying of cancer, then the moral justification that you gave yourself for entering a lucrative but illegal venture to provide for your family as you would no longer be able to do so normally is now gone. Another common adage is "You ...


9

He is dying from cancer remember, and Gus asked him what he planned to do after his contractual obligations we're fulfilled, to which he then offered 15 million/yes to continue as he was doing. But Walt never expected to do that well with building his family a nest egg for after his death, hence his comment to Jesse about being grateful, and not think about ...


7

Shorter sequences save time for audiences, and money for producers There is an excellent article on the history of tv show credits here: A brief history of TV shows' opening credit sequences In it, it talks about how after a tradition of longer sequences, the need for them declined as audiences wanted to get straight to the action. Following the example ...


7

Well, it's all CGI. TL;DR They used CG dots to create a fly. They tried for real flies, but they had to replace these with CG flies. They researched about fly's movements, variations in speed and directions etc to make it easier to shot like a real fly. Long read; From this interview with Mat Beck, fxg: The fly that seems to terrorize Walt and ...


7

From Vulture.com: The amazing shot of Skyler reflected in the microwave was completely accidental. Gilligan admits not knowing he got it until the editor complimented it.


5

Originally the contents of the letter were a voice-over during the final images: Originally, in the first draft of the script, that’s how the story ended. With Jesse driving through Alaska, and you hear the voiceover of what’s inside of the letter. Aaron Paul elaborated further to TV Guide: That was the very first thing that Vince Gilligan wrote when ...


4

As far as I remember, the reason why Skyler changed her mind, was not mentioned in the episodes. Based on her situation, we can make few guesses though. She was disappointed with her family life. She was frustrated with Walter's way of life, his cancer, her pregnancy, her sister etc. All of these were causes of stress in her life. She was at her limit ...


4

But he doesn't kill him and instead settles in for a pizza and cold beer on the ride back to his cage. Why did he choose a pizza and beer instead of his freedom? I feel like you've very much misread Jesse's response. He is in tears because he realizes that anything other than acquiescing to Todd will mean Brock's death. He doesn't settle for beer and ...


4

Breaking Bad already showed us that Jesse was broken by the gang, hence him failing to kill Todd now even when he has the opportunity. It is even explicitly stated in an earlier scene in this movie that if Jesse tries anything, then Todd will need to visit Brock. Todd's death or disappearance would inevitably cause the same. As Alan Sepinwall writes: ...


4

I'm pretty sure he just spiked walts drink so that he would pass out and stop obsessing so that Jesse could get on with the cook


3

Sleeping pills. He wanted Walt to fall asleep so he could steal more meth. He knew Walt was on to him.


3

I believe it's because Walt and Jessie are the cause of the situation. Walt showed obvious displeasure in having Gale to work with rather than Jessie. He was bored with the guy and didn't vibe with him. I'd even go so far as to say he missed Jesse. The entire show displays a constant male role model relationship between Walt and Jessie. For walt, who had, ...


3

That is a safe assumption. From the Wikipedia article: Gustavo Fring is established as an alias, as neither the DEA or Mike can find any records about him prior to his arrival in Mexico. The Wikipedia article about the character is quite long and provides some extra information including the possibility that he was originally part of the Chilean ...


3

Is the rowboat painting in more than 2 episodes? No, as you figured out already it appeared twice, once in S02E03: Second time in S05E08 The only change in the painting was probably due to lighting, as painting seems the same. Does it have multiple meanings? Might be possible but I can't figure out myself neither anyone else did as per my google-fu. The ...


2

If Better Call Saul was never made (shudder the thought), then Breaking Bad could be enjoyed on it's own. I watched Breaking Bad first, and now am watching Better Call Saul. I think it's kind of cool to go back in time as "Saul's" character is built for the audience. Both shows can stand on their own, though having Both of them makes for a synchronicity that ...


2

I'd add an element to @JonnyBones point. Indeed, Walt happens to meet Jane's father (not knowing he is), Donald, in a bar after he brought the money to Jesse & Jane. Walt talks to Donald about his newborn baby girl, his 16 year old boy and then about his "nephew", meaning actually Jesse, and the ...frustration that goes along with "Yes, as a matter ...


2

According to THR: The Walter White scene takes place within the space of season two's "4 Days Out", one of the most celebrated episodes in the Breaking Bad pantheon, in which Walt and Jesse's RV breaks down in the middle of the desert; it's one of their closest bonding points in the show, hence Walt's less-threatening-than-usual demeanor in the restaurant....


2

Jesse "purchased" his house through Saul, who very likely used a shell company to do so. Saul is known to use tactics such as this for personal use in his many schemes for example he requests payments to a company called Ice Station Zebra as to not directly associate himself with them. So while Jesse is living in that house it is unlikely he used his own ...


2

Well, If I am not mistaken there is a scene where Walt is hiding just outside the window to Salamanca's, which means that is his likely means of ingress as he certainly climbed out the window to hide. This method doesn't risk him being spotted with the exception of any external surveillance, which he very likely cased out beforehand in preparation for his ...


2

The reason Brock is odd around Walt is that he's only seen him twice and doesn't know him at all. I remember that when the first time Brock has seen Jesse, he was very quiet around him too. But Brock definitely knew something about poison, when Walt tries to make small talk, Brock doesn't seem to be too enthusiastic about interacting with him. But he ...


1

From my memory of the show and a few quick google searches, it doesn't seem like whether or not Jesse graduated was explicitly mentioned in the series. There's a few places where Walt called Jesse a "drop-out" which would makes the scene in El Camino make a little more sense (Walt assuming Jesse was a dropout the entire time until Jesse corrects him). ...


1

The episode is One Minute, and from Gale: Despite Walt respecting and enjoying working with Gale, he was forced to fire him in order to prevent Jesse from filing a lawsuit against his brother-in-law Hank.


1

Flies were a common insect that appeared in Breaking Bad. It has been speculated that the fly represents guilt, contamination, irrational obsession, and the loss of control in Walter White's life. In this case, it would represent his shooting of Mike. If you haven't completed the entire series yet, I won't give up the ending but I will tell you to notice ...


1

Remember that in season 2 episode 4 "Down" Walt tells his son that he cannot use both feet to drive You can't use one foot on each pedal Then in the episode you mention (3-12 "Half-measures"), when Walt notices that Jr is still using both feet, the son tells his father I looked it up. New Mexico says all I need is a note from a doctor to what Walt ...


1

The problem is not the book itself, it's the dedication from Gale on page 3 that shows the same "W.W." Hank saw in season 4 (after he was given Gale's file). Hank recalls that very scene ("To W.W. my star, my perfect silence" etc.) Walt might not have even seen that dedication, or paid attention to it. He didn't give much esteem to the book (nor to Gale), ...


1

In the scene where Gus comes to Gale's apartment and asks if he can take over / cook Walter's formula, and then pressures him to agree that just "one more cook" would suffice to master the remaining details, it's pretty clear he intends to kill Walt as soon as Gale can take over. He also makes a point to state that Walt is "dying of cancer" and makes it ...


1

The last time Walt, Jesse and Jack were together in Ozymandias, Walt explicitly asked Jack to kill Jesse, so it makes sense this was still his intention when he went back to Jack's in Felina... until he saw what sorry state Jesse was in (as basically a slave, not a partner of Jack's).


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