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16

Short answer: No. One of the most historically inaccurate movies of all time. These were simply decorative for the movie. Most of the imagery can be taken with huge grains of salt. Check out this fantastic breakdown by the History Buffs youtube guy:


11

According to IMDb they're chanting MacAulish, which means "son of Wallace." Following the death of Murron MacClannough (Catherine McCormack), when the Scots took out the very first garrison of English soldiers, the crowd starts chanting 'MacAulish...MacAulish!' then changes to 'Wallace...Wallace!' Scottish surnames beginning with 'Mac' mean 'son of...'. ...


8

Here is also a list of Errors in Braveheart, but the painted blue faces are not entirely inaccurate, it's just it was not used for battle and out of practice by the time of Wallace, as the idea of it may stem Pict Tradition. Error #4: The Scots didn’t paint their faces for battle At least they no longer did by the time of Wallace. What Gibson was ...


6

The scene is the second "goof" of this YouTube video:


6

It's a bit different to Seanland's answer, but this site gives a couple of instances (both on the first page). Visible crew/equipment: At the funeral of William Wallace's wife, Murron, a white van can be seen. He bends down to kiss her and as he stands back up, if you look over his left shoulder through the trees you can see the van going past. It's very ...


3

In the script of the movie Braveheart (Section 9) the Scots are chanting "MacAulish, MacAulish, WALLACE, WALLACE!" The term "Mac" means "son of", and "Aulish" is intended to be a variation of the Medieval Gaelic name "Uallas" (later translated to the Anglican, "Wallace"). Where the writers got the spelling "Aulish" is anyone's guess. Perhaps they were just ...


1

It's hard to say because most of the camera angles in that scene are taken from the lance side of the knights. Any sheathed weapons, such as swords, would be on the shield side for a crossdraw, and thus away from the camera angle. There is one shot from a falling horse late in the scene where the hilt of a sheathed sword becomes briefly visible. Whether this ...


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