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The director of Blade Runner 2049, Denis Villeneuve was asked this very question and his answer can be found at DenofGeek.com So when Blade Runner 2049 director Denis Vileneuve met with reporters at San Diego Comic-Con, someone inevitably had to ask which version of Blade Runner is Blade Runner 2049 a sequel to. "The thing is that I was raised with the ...


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No, it is not necessary, but will ultimately enhance your understanding and experience In order of importance, story-wise, I would say the short films are ranked as follows: Blade Runner: Black Out 2022 2036: Nexus Dawn 2048: Nowhere to Run Incidentally, this is also my recommended order of watching, as it is chronological and will therefore make most ...


30

This is described in the anime "Blade Runner Black Out 2022", which serves as one of three prequels to Blade Runner 2049. With the introduction of the Nexus8 line of replicants, humans became more violent toward them and started to hunt and kill them. A few of them tried to erase the database of replicants. Iggy, Trixie and Ren, the technician responsible ...


24

I'd say a large part of why it's seen as so iconic is because it's influenced a lot of what came after. The movie was released in 1982, and has been referenced as being a huge source of influence for several created works that came later, such as the widely popular Battlestar Galactica reboot that was on TV in the middle of the last decade, as well as games ...


16

While Paulie_D already gives a very good answer right from the director himself, after having seen the film we can take a closer look at its story1, be it only to pretty much confirm what Villeneuve says, that it's ambiguous and ultimately unimportant (i.e. all versions). Let's first take a look at what the most significant differences are, the ones ...


16

TL;DR The replicants' eye glow is meant to reveal their mechanical artificiality to us (and by extension, their lack of a human soul), as if their eyes are merely lenses reflecting light. Long answer Eyes are the windows to the soul. Unsurprisingly, then, eye symbolism is rife throughout Blade Runner: the Voight-Kampff machine focusing on the iris to test ...


16

In Blade Runner Black Out 2022, one of the three short films release prior to 2049, it is shown that in an attempt to wipe replicants out of databases in Los Angeles, they detonated a nuclear device above the city. We can assume that this detonation worked similar to modern nukes in that it creates an EMP which destroyed most data archives in the city.


15

Summary: Yes, he probably should have seen it coming. But, it was a good plot device to highlight Roy's mental superiority. Detailed: It's worth pointing out that, although Ridley Scott denied it was intentional, this game uses the conclusion of the Immortal Game: The Immortal Game is a chess game played by Adolf Anderssen and Lionel Kieseritzky on ...


15

The director says it's not necessary to see Blade Runner first Director Denis Villeneuve said that he intended for it to be accessible to first time viewers. "That was one of the challenges ... to create a movie that would be in total relationship to the first one, but could stand on its own," he said when we met to discuss the film in London ...


14

What does Blade Runner mean? The world of the Blade Runner films is based on the Philip K. Dick novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (1968). However, the name 'Blade Runner' was taken from a different book called The Bladerunner (1974) by Alan E. Nourse, in which the term "bladerunner" (one word) is used to describe black market suppliers ...


14

The Voight-Kampff test as it appears in the book and the movies comprises a series of questions designed to elicit an emotional response intended to measure empathy. The 'machine' is just intended to measure the involuntary response, in a similar way to a polygraph today. It's not entirely clear from the list of questions which ones 'score' more highly ...


13

It appears as though the leading cause of death in replicants is a form of cellular death, akin to 'old age' in humans. Remember that in the first movie, Tyrell admits that the short lifespan was not by design, but was the only way they could create them in the first place when he says: “You were made as well as we could make you.” Much like humans, ...


13

According to the first movie's press kit, they were "A genetically engineered creature composed entirely of organic substance." If you think about it - they are so physically indistinguishable from a real human that they must be screened through psychological and emotional testing (otherwise, x-ray's or blood testing or other medical testing would be used). ...


11

Anybody without an eye code who can pass the Voigt-Kampff test is human (but unfortunately we don't see this in either film) There are two ways to detect a replicant that we see in the films: the Voigt-Kampff test and the Nexus-9 eye code. Humans will pass the Voigt-Kampff test, but the audience is never shown anybody who does In Blade Runner, Nexus-6 ...


10

The explosion is the gun going off -- in other words, muzzle flash -- and/or the beam (that purple light) subsequently coming up through the table. From there, the beam passes through the thermos before striking Holden, which sends him through the wall. To provide more info on the beam shot by the gun, here's an excerpt from a Blade Runner fan site that ...


10

Step by Step. Leon shoots Holden from under the table but through the table The blast penetrates through a vacuum flask containing either coffee or tea (not oil) before hitting Holden. Holden is spun around in his chair and through the wall by the blast, presumably Leon stands during this action. Leon then finishes the job by shooting Holden again....once ...


10

There are a couple of premises I'd dispute there. In the book, the reverence for living things is because they are so rare and don't exist any more. There is a longing for contact with real life, so part of that desire and longing is because they are so rare. "I'd kill the wasp" is not, actually, the expected answer. The answer is irrelevant. The response ...


10

Replicants certainly do have emotions - Roy Batty exhibits anger and ultimately sadness; several of them exhibit fear at being discovered and retired. However, they are relatively underdeveloped, emotionally speaking. Replicants are physically matured and "born" at full adult growth - they don't go through a childhood to socially and emotionally mature like ...


9

According to Ridley Scott, yes, he is a replicant. In the Director's Cut version, the biggest clue for analysts was the appearance of a unicorn on screen while Deckard is lost in thought. The image of the mythical creature appears again towards the end of the film when he picks up an origami model discarded by another character, Gaff. As the replicants had ...


9

Whether Deckard is himself a replicant is left deliberately ambiguous. In the original novel, a security force exists in addition to the regular police force in Los Angeles, whose operatives are termed 'blade runners' and who are actually replicants, created to do that special job of locating and terminating replicants that go 'rogue'. It's a kind of 'set a ...


8

The Wikipedia page referred to gives an exhaustive list of the differences, in terms of deleted scenes. There are indeed many scenes in the Final Cut which were omitted from earlier releases. But this is not really to the point. The answer to the question is what differences those changes have made to the plot. The Final Cut (2007) is a very different ...


8

From the Blade Runner Wikia, the machine: ...measures contractions of the iris muscle and the presence of invisible airborne particles emitted from the body... [The test] is used primarily by Blade Runners to determine if a suspect is truly human by measuring the degree of his empathic response through carefully worded questions and statements. So it ...


7

After watching the movie I have to say that to get the full experience from the movie you absolutely have to watch the original (I watched the Final Cut) and the three short films that were released this year. Thing is: a lot of major plot-points revolve around the events of these other products in a big way for the original movie and smaller but mutually ...


7

Replicants in the Blade Runner world are generally slaves. Especially the four who are on the run trying to just live. With that said, Batty, the ring leader, likes to talk heady. Kowalski is represented a little dumb, literally supposed to be the muscle of the group. He is likely only repeating the things he heard: things Batty said to him to convince him ...


6

Both Blade Runner and Battlestar Galactica are influenced by earlier work. In fact, the very first story to talk about robots actually used the term to refer to artificial humans. You can find a list of "Artificial Human" tropes here http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/ArtificialHuman Ronald Moore did acknowledge that Battlestar Galactica ...


6

Another way to think of the film as iconic is in its relationship to cyber-punk. You cannot say, for example, that BR is the first film to be rooted in cyber-punk because it is not really possible to draw a distinctive line delineating where New Wave SciFi of the 60's and 70's ends and cyber-punk--a child (perhaps bastard child :-) ) of the late 70's and ...


6

I'm not going to suggest that mine is the best answer, but I will attempt to flesh my comments out... the first film, Blade Runner, is based on the novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by the famous dark science-fiction writer Philip K. Dick. (Other well-known works include: Man in the High Castle, Minority Report, A Scanner Darkly) One of the ...


6

As the text card at the very beginning of the film clearly states, the events in the movie take place starting in November 2019. So one can assume that a replicant “born” on January 8, 2016 would start to slowly fall apart during the timespan from November 2019 to the beginning of January 2020.


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As pointed out in the comments. The human aesthetic was mandatory to Tyrell's vision of "More human than human" and his God/Creator complex. Creating anything else wouldn't be human enough. Depending if you follow easter eggs and if you believe that Weyland-Yutani and Tyrell are in the same cinematic Universe and not just referenced for kicks within each ...


5

TYRELL The facts of life. I'll be blunt. To make an alteration in the evolvement of an organic life system, at least by men, makers or not, is fatal. A coding sequence can't be revised once it's established. BATTY Why? TYRELL Because by the second day of incubation any cells that have undergone reversion mutation give rise to revertant ...


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