110

They don't know. They don't care. It doesn't matter what were the original colors. As the movie was filmed in black and white, the set, the costumes, even the makeup was designed to look good in black and white and not to have correct color. A famous example is the sets of the Addams Family which were built in pink, but the filming rendered them in grim ...


26

Wikipedia suggests that they are filmed in color and the converted to monochrome on post-production Since the 1970s, fiction feature films have been filmed almost exclusively in color. Some films after the transition to color are occasionally presented in black-and-white for budgetary or stylistic reasons. This is a list of notable feature films whose ...


25

There are lots of ways they can determine the colors. If those movies props are still available, they can take a look at it. Usually, their descriptions are also available, they can guess the colors using them. If there is not, then they will guess or see which colors will fit best. It would depend on the producer or the person deciding on the colors to be ...


13

Director David Slade suggested Charlie Brooker to shoot the episode in Black and White and he agreed with it. They initially did some tests and then decided to shoot it in B&W. Director David Slade explained it in an interview. I found Charlie to be incredibly open — very, very trusting from the get-go. I quickly signed up, and within a month, I was ...


12

Clerks was shot in black and white for budgetary purposes, they just didn't have the money to film it in color. Frances Ha was filmed digitally (Color) and in black and white, and was done in b&w to evoke reminisces of movies such as Woody Allen's Manhattan, or works by Truffaut. I cannot find any references explaining why La Haine is in black and ...


10

There are three general situations: For material which was deliberately shot in black and white, there might not be any "true" intended color, so whoever is doing the colorizing may have to invent it. For material that was shot in color, but for which no color copy survives, someone who is attempting to recreate the original may use any existing references ...


9

Dead of Night (1945) From Wikipedia, here's the synopsis: Architect Walter Craig arrives at a country house party where he reveals to the assembled guests that he has seen them all in a dream. He appears to have no prior personal knowledge of them but he is able to predict spontaneous events in the house before they unfold. The other guests ...


9

This scene is a key scene in the movie The Game where Sean Penn, playing Conrad, buys a thrilling game of survival for his brother's (Michael Douglas, playing Nicholas) birthday. The flashback concerns young Nicholas witnessing the suicide of his father when he was 48 years old, the same age that Nicholas is now celebrating. From imdb: The game focuses on a ...


8

For low-budget independent films pre-2005 or so, the reason was often primarily budgetary. Until shooting digitally became a viable option, shooting black-and-white cost roughly a quarter what shooting in color cost, for the film stock itself and the processing. But that doesn't begin to cover all the additional savings you'd get by forgoing color film. ...


7

Some directors just like black and white movies and sometimes have ideas that seem to be better suited to B&W. It's usually an artistic choice, not for financial reasons. Directors like Jim Jarmusch, Darren Aronofsky and Tim Burton actively choose, or sometimes insist that certain projects not be in color. Woody Allen shot Manhattan in B&W because “...


7

Set it on fire Perhaps from a lit cigarette. Old film stock was nitrate based... Nitrate film base was the first transparent flexible plasticized base commercially available, thanks to celluloid developments by John Carbutt, Hannibal Goodwin, and Eastman Kodak in the 1880s. Eastman was the first to manufacture this for public sale, in 1889. ...


6

First of all, remember that The Wizard of Oz was shot in color (except for the Kansas scenes). But, for the general case, where the color isn't immediately obvious (sky, water, grass, trees, etc.), you have several resources: For costumes, you may have access to period clothing, or color photographs of such clothing (such as these amazing color ...


6

This seems to be the American B&W comedy The Reformer and the Redhead from 1950. Hot-tempered Kathleen Maguire enlists the services of a young attorney to help her zookeeper father get his job back after he is fired for political reasons. In the midst of uncovering local political corruption and dealing with a lion that's escaped from the zoo, the two ...


6

Might it have been The Triplets of Belleville from 2003? There most certainly is a huge ship in it... seen by a vaguely Asian-looking old woman... and there is some black and white in the film... Any of this ringing any bells?


4

It's possible you saw The Time Travelers (AKA Time Trap), a film about scientists travelling through time from 1964, on a B&W TV because you're pretty much describing the ending, after they manage to go back to their time: The survivors return to the lab, where they make a strange discovery. Their past selves are still in the lab, yet to pass through ...


4

I have been a projectionist for over 20 years, so hopefully can help to answer your question. You don't say what period you are setting your story in as that has a bit of an impact on exactly how the damage might happen. Nitrate film would have caught fire, from getting stuck in the gate of the projector and the heat from the Carbon Arcs. There were cut ...


4

As explained in the relevant Wikipedia page: Following was written and planned to be as inexpensive to produce as possible [...] For the most part, Nolan filmed without professional film lighting equipment, largely employing available light. This was made easier by the decision to use 16 mm black and white film. This was explained by Nolan in ...


3

Twenty Minutes of Love is an early Chaplin Keystone Comedy that involves sets of lovers and a stolen watch. It doesn't exactly follow the scenario you describe, but if it is a Chaplin film you are thinking of, than this is probably it! If this is not it, you might look into other Keystone Comedies that do not feature Chaplin. They very much relied on ...


3

I believe your're looking for the 1958 film Curse of the Faceless Man The story is about a gladiator who is discovered at Pompeii. The stone like features would be down to the ash from the volcano eruption of Mount Vesuvius. In the trailer below you can see the scene where the driver is strangled. A lady does sit to sketch the body at one point and think ...


3

Might it be The Bubble (1966) (AKA Fantastic Invasion of Planet Earth)? Here is a plot description from an IMDb user review: A small prop plane flying through a rainstorm must land because one of the two passengers is about to have a baby. When the young couple and the pilot put down in the small American town, they find all the townspeople are in a ...


2

Sometimes filmmakers use black & white for showing the darker aspects of story. For example in the 1998 film American History X, the parts of the movie where Edward Norton's character is a racist, are shown in Black & White, whereas the part of the movie where Edward Norton is no longer a racist and is seen repenting are shot in color. Take a look ...


2

I don't remember "feeding centers", but the dome and the light plane and the aliens bring to mind The Slime People (1963). Does this trailer look familiar? From the Wikipedia entry: The film concerns a race of subterranean reptile-men (dubbed "slime people" due to their slime-covered skin) who create a wall of "solidified fog" around Los Angeles and ...


2

I believe you are referring to the movie "A Thousand Clowns", made in 1965 starring Jason Robards. The plot from imdb, "A middle-aged iconoclast, doggedly avoiding the tedium of employment and conventional life, faces the prospect of losing custody of his young ward.". Here is a brief clip with Jason Robards: .


2

Charlie Chaplin's Essanay short In the Park(1915) has a very similar storyline. While a count (Leo White) sweet-talks a woman on a park bench, a pickpocket (Lloyd Bacon) steals her purse. When the thief meets Chaplin, he attempts to pick Chaplin's pocket, but Chaplin ends up stealing the stolen purse instead. It is next briefly stolen by Bud Jamison, but ...


1

Old television shows were shot using motion picture film of that era, and were shot at either 24 or 25 frames per second. Television video today is played at 30 frames per second. The speed problems you see are artifacts of the conversion process. The shows you watched might have been converted to television during the 1950's when kinescopes were largely ...


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