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26

Andrew Martin gives 3 excellent interpretations of the ending in his response to a question about the telekinesis in the movie. His most satisfying explanation of the ending (both to him and to me) is this one: In the last moment of the play he actually kills himself with the gun (instead of merely wounding himself). This makes sense, as everything after ...


22

It's difficult to say. To really understand, you have to look at the whole movie including the ending (which I will spoil in this answer). A full (also spoilerific) breakdown of the movie's plot can be found here, but ultimately we see throughout the film that he has these telekinetic, supernatural moments - but all are revealed to be hallucinations, time ...


20

I know I teased this as a comment, but the answer really is disappointing… They used CGI to mask the transitions. After comments This doesn't mean it wasn't clever or a lot of hard work by some amazing artists, merely that these days we're quite used to half of humanity vanishing, worlds colliding, or a woman pushing a space ship across galaxies. Mundane ...


16

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignornance) is an inherently metaphorical and rather surreal film. Throughout the film, we see Riggan (Micheal Keaton) struggling with the voice of Birdman, the superhero he played in the 90's, in his head. Birdmans voice is a representation of Riggan's commercial self - the part of him that wants to quit the stage show, ...


15

It does not appear to have been so. Reading Kirsten Acuna's Business Insider article, It Took Michael Keaton About 27 Seconds To Decide To Be In 'Birdman': During a panel at New York Comic Con for the film, Keaton shared the story of how he was cast in director Alejandro González Iñárritu's movie about a washed-up actor, Riggan Thomson (Keaton), hoping to ...


13

The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance It's the title of Tabitha Dickinson's review about the play. She's a critic, initially she detests Riggan and his play but after actually watching it, she turns in a positive review praising Riggan's performance and his play. A similar question was asked here and there's an excellent answer by a user. Tabitha Dickinson ...


10

Riggan dies twice in the movie. The first time is when he shoots himself in the head onstage. He really dies, as is evidenced by the jump cuts and scenes from his life, ending with jellyfish on the beach from his last suicide attempt. He goes to a purgatory of sorts where all of his wishes are fulfilled - His ex-wife loves him, his daughter acts like a ...


8

Here's what screenwriters of the movie says about the ending. Dinelaris said "a few different approaches" were considered, including finishes that felt satirical or dramatic, before the writers settled on what made the final script. "We're not going to sit around and explain the ending. I guess my thing is, if you can silence the voice of ...


6

Simple: it's most likely a marketing strategy. The two tactics employed are called either limited release, or platform release. Limited release is when a movie is released to a limited number of theaters in an effort to gauge the appeal a film may have to a wider audience. Platform release is when they release a film to see what kind of word of mouth it ...


4

It was my impression, while watching the film, that there was a series of events that led to the protagonist using a real gun. He disliked Mike (played by Edward Norton), and saw Mike flirting with his daughter He had a momentary lapse in his dressing room with his ex-wife, and was disappointed when she didn't return his affections The critic that he met ...


4

Riggin dies at the beginning of the movie. The events of the movie occurred in in an instant as Riggin laid dying on the beach from his suicide attempt, which ultimately was successful. That is why we see the jellyfish at the beginning and the end of movie. The whole movie occurred on the beach. This is why he flew at the end (to heaven we can assume). ...


4

I think he did go down but not through the window but by the stairs ( Like the last scene where he was shown to have jumped from the roof but in actual he took a taxi to the theater) and was addressing the press ( which was thrown out by the police in earlier scene) . So while his daughter looked down thinking that his father had jumped (Presuming the worst) ...


4

Well, Riggan didn't actually jump off the roof or fly, those were just manifestations in his mind. If you recall, it was somewhat implied that he flew right to the theater and walked in, and then you saw the taxi and realized he must have taken the taxi to the theater since he can't really fly.


4

So, as far as I can tell, your question is, "Why are people not more disturbed by the depressing implications of this apparently happy ending?" My answer is that you are partially correct, the ending is not a happy one. However, perhaps the reason that you haven't seen anyone argue against the idea that the ending is a "happy" one is that no one is ...


3

Riggan is clearly suffering from some form of mental degradation from the outset of the film... ... his madness is manifested by the disembodied voice of "Birdman", talking to him, and indeed the film opens with a sequence of him 'levitating' whilst being ridiculed by this ethereal presence. The film is a self reflexive Ouroboros, and whilst not strictly ...


2

In my opinion he jumped and died. Ok, the first scene where he flies and ends up in front of the theater he is saying something to the affect of "up here where we belong, above them all." Then it cuts forward to the intermission, his ex wife learns that he attempted suicide once. What he is actually telling her that he is really going to go through with it ...


2

While it's scored highly among critics and fans alike, it's still an indie film. Indie films just don't have the distribution channels that major studios have. If the film continues to do well and maintain favorable press, it will probably get re-released to theaters like the movie "Chef" did (most likely after an infusion of capital from firms who know ...


2

I don't think Riggan died at all. The ending seems to represent him finally letting go of his ego by leaving Birdman on the toilet. He "stepped out on a ledge" & soared leaving behind the burdens of trying to stay relevant in the brutal showbiz industry. Without the ego, he now has his family back & his daughter smiles knowing that he has finally ...


2

To understand the ending it’s important to understand the key themes of the movie. Ego – Birdman represents Riggan’s ego. You can read about this from the Director on your own. In one scene Riggan starts to compare Birdman to Icarus who died of hubris. Nature of art / literary critique – the French philosopher Roland Barthes is mentioned during the press ...


2

Even being told as real time stories, all of these movies (The Rope, Slacker and Birdman) had cuts in between scenes. In the case of Birdman, required a lot of preparation and choreography from the crew, and post-production work. But a movie called Russian Ark (2002) is in fact a single shot, for the entire movie. According to Wikipedia, "Three attempts ...


2

I'll make some separate points: First, I like your analogy story! Riggan's suicide attempt may look like just that to the audience but to Tabitha, it may very well be a sacrifice for art. This is where your analogy doesn't work: stage is a performance art and the suicide attempt can be seen as a part of it. Even if you stretch your analogy to make the ...


1

Q. How is this not intensely, disturbingly, distressingly horrifying? A1. Because it's just a movie. A2. Because the movie tells the story of just one pathetically approval-obsessed person -- not the story of the human condition. It's a cautionary tale: "Don't be like Birdman."


1

It is titled this because the entire movie is about man who is ignorant to how insignificant he is in the grand scheme of life. And his ignorance leads him to accomplish something spectacular: successfully starring, directing, and producing a play on Broadway. Few Hollywood actors are known to ever accomplish this feat and most of them don't go from the ...


1

I like to think this is a metaphor about Riggan's fall. Riggan is a part of a powerful and massive planet, but he left it (Planet Birdman) and he does not know to what he belongs. While he falls, he is struggling and tries to hang on to anything around (friends, family). The bright light generated by an Asteroid could be his show, or his lost career). He ...


1

I don't believe there is any connection, this is just a normal line that people would say that you can't say that, no different to the the correct nomenclature is Asian-American from Big Lebowski. Additionally there have been some instances where usage of such terms has been censored (on TV at least). The comment to me in Birdman and In Bruges is just a ...


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