86

He decided that being rude was the fastest way to get people to leave. If he had politely asked it is very likely that a lot of people would have hung around to try to talk to him. Equally if he had claimed that he was busy it would still have been weird to kick everybody out. Bear in mind that he lives in a mansion and part of the point of living in a ...


46

Ducard is actually Ra's Al Ghul. The "Ra's" that Bruce leaves for dead in the monastery when he burns it down is a decoy. So Bruce did try to kill Ra's and burned down his house, he just killed the wrong guy and the real Ra's came back for revenge. Hence the line "You burned my house and left me for dead."


41

Andrew Martin's answer It's not a reference to a specific joke, but rather a witty line by Bruce Wayne to effectively ask his butler to entertain all the guests in his absence. is not entirely correct. It was actually a light ribbing of Alfred to indicate he needs a better sense of humor. "Tell them all that joke you know" is meant to indicate that ...


39

He needed everyone to leave for their own safety, but couldn’t tell them that. He perceived (correctly) Ra’s Al Ghul as a threat to the safety of everyone at the party. He knew they all needed to leave immediately, or become collateral damage. He also knew that he couldn’t just say that because no one would believe Bruce Wayne if he said that, and he couldn’...


35

Well, yes and no. There is no clear evidence that he is or is not nearly immortal. We don't actually see him die at the end of Batman Begins, neither is any kind of Lazarus pit nor its absence ever mentioned in the movie. However, there is a strong argument to be made that he is just a normal mortal person like you and me (bar any "normal" kind of better ...


31

I'm going off a fairly faint memory here, but I think that those "straps" were to be the membranes of his cape. Lucius Fox showed him earlier the special cloth that when given an electric charge would go rigid. Bruce was practicing making the cloth go rigid using the gloves to trigger it. This allows him to force the cape to a particular shape, allowing ...


30

The scene in question proceeds like this (from the script): Wayne hurries through the hall. Alfred in pursuit. Tables of food and decoration fill the hall. ALFRED: But Master Wayne, the guests will be arriving. Wayne turns. WAYNE: Keep them happy until I arrive. Tell them that joke you know. Wayne hurries off. Alfred watches him go, exasperated. It's not a ...


19

When Bruce recognizes Ra's Al Ghul is back, he realizes he needs to end the party and get rid of everyone. Bruce Wayne actually wanted everyone to leave before he even joined the party, just after asking Alfred if Fox was still there. With Bruce having just brought in Rachel [who had been poisoned], and with Fox being there, Bruce was more concerned with ...


13

Batman vs. Superman is in continuity with Man of Steel, but shares zero continuity with Nolan's trilogy, also referred to as The Dark Knight Trilogy. This new series of films will be referred to as the DC Extended Universe. As such, the writers are able to take liberties with various portrayals of events in the mythos of Batman, including how he developed ...


13

Bruce is highly resourceful. He did cross continents using nothing but his wits, twice (firstly when he ran off in Batman Begins and when he returned in The Dark Knight Rises). Considering who he is along with the above, does one really have to suspend their disbelief when considering how he notified Alfred of his location, considering EVERYTHING else that ...


11

I have just rewatched the scene, and the disruptor is not thrown away. He lowers it gun, putting it next to his right leg, where it was at the beginning of the scene. In movies, if a gun is disposed off willingly, it is usually (always?) dramatically thrown away, and not just gently dropped next to one's leg. Besides, here it is, mere 20 seconds later, ...


11

Ra's al Ghul is a Batman villain created in 1971. He has spanned multiple titles, and media. He's been killed, and resurrected multiple times (Lazarus Pit or otherwise). The Ra's al Ghul in the Nolan Batman Trilogy, like in the comics, is a person, NOT a title/mantle. The Ra's al Ghul in Arrow is simply the title of the leader of the League of Assasins. ...


11

The stories of all the three movies incorporate many influences from famous comic storylines, while none of them has been directly taken from a particular comic in its entirety. So they were more or less written from scratch a bit but also not completey without base in some particular comics. The primary influence, maybe less storywise than more ...


10

It was Holmes' decision It was not because of the Golden Raspberry Holmes begged off working on the sequel, she says, to pursue other projects, and was replaced in the role of Assistant District Attorney Rachel Dawes by Maggie Gyllenhaal. But that doesn't mean Holmes has any regrets about turning down the project, she insisted. "Not at all. I had a ...


8

As the other excellent answers have shown the movies are rich of various overarching themes, be they political or philosophical, about a hero or his city. But on a very personal level they are about a man, in particular Bruce Wayne's struggle to cope with the tragedy he experienced as a child and to overcome the resulting grief, fear and anger that ...


7

Combination of things here. First, as @DustinDavis mentions above, this wasn't "designed" for Batman and the capabilities were already on the vehicle. Despite the fact he modifies each vehicle from its military design, Batman probably saw use for the feature and kept it. Going off of that, Batman does not use the missile feature on people, he instead uses ...


7

MTV was able to ask Bale about that process of his bat-voice while he is out doing press for his new movie Out of the Furnace. "I got there. They put me in Val Kilmer's suit. It didn't even fit properly, and I stood in it and I went 'I feel like an idiot.' What kind of guy walks around, dressed like a bat? And is then going to go 'Hello, how are ...


6

Karan Shishoo's answer is almost certainly correct (Bruce tried to kill Ra's, and only mistaken identity caused him to drag Liam Neeson's character to safety. Had he known who Ra's really was, he would not have done so), but there is an important element of the movie that that answer leaves out: the difference between personal identity and symbolic identity. ...


5

I don't think this is ever explained in the movie directly but I would suggest this is a matter of concentration Not Bruce's concentration but rather the concentrated liquid which makes the Fear Gas/Toxin. Bruce actually says.. I’ve felt those effects before...but this was much more potent and It’s some kind of weaponized hallucinogen. Administered ...


4

Alfred is an ex-military man who acquired a number of advanced and practical skills. Considering his capability with mechanics and engineering, it stands for reason that he is able to locate and retrieve wounded individuals. However... this scene is glossed over in the movie for theatrical purposes.


4

Emotion is a complicated thing. Sure, Bruce saved Ducard, and left him in care so that he could continue to survive. Bruce was clearly hoping that this information would be enough for Ducard to be okay with all of this. Unfortunately, despite Bruce's best efforts, he was not. Bruce had burned down the house, and apparently the literal act of saving his ...


3

The Green Arrow and Batman Begins, whilst both being owned by DC, are separate commercial entities and exist in different continuities; the Arrowverse and the Nolanverse, respectively. They share no overlapping Diegesis, and exist in separate narrative universes.


3

I wasn't sure if this holds as an actual answer, but I'll write it anyway. I'd rather say the burden of proof lies on the question's theory here, but in lack of a more "official" answer for now, here's my reasoning: No, he doesn't. If your only premise to the question is the fact that Batman sounds a bit similar to Liam Neeson in that scene (which I won't ...


3

The message is straight forward and twofold: No matter how bad things are, a single person or single idea can make a difference. This contrasts with most heroes (e.g. Superman) which follows a basic religious story (omnipotent being arrives and looks over lowly mankind, protecting us from ourselves). In Batman the symbol is the thing, and it is bigger ...


3

In this article it's explained how Jacques Sayagh, a homeless man living in France, maintained a bodybuilder physique. The article suggests that it's his 'heart and determination' that keeps him going - we certainly see those characteristics in Bruce. In terms of equipment, we see that Jacques uses body-weight training, and simple resistance bands. ...


2

I thought it was strange particularly given how he does it in that scene. "Could you please gather up all the damning documentation that implicates Wayne enterprises in losing a weapon of mass destruction? Oh by the way, I'm firing you before you complete my instructions and are totally able to just take those files and walk out the front door with them?" ...


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