56

These are not just statues, they're suits of armor and battle-garb from various cultures. Many of them are European plate armor (basically all of the full-metal ones). The fourth image's is Japanese. I'm not sure where the armor in the fifth image is from, exactly, but I suspect it's one kind of African or Native American garb (if someone knows what it is ...


28

They may have some personal significance to Batman, but the main reason for it, both in and out of universe, is to set up a distance between Batman and anyone that sees Bruce. As in any Batman medium, Bruce is a playboy. So filthy rich it's a joke. Extravagant. Expected to be odd and eccentric, as rich people are known to be. It's explicit in how Vale and ...


15

From the wiki: The Gotham Cathedral is a monolithic cathedral that stands more than 800 feet from the ground. Once intended to be the spiritual center of the city, the Cathedral has since fallen into ruin as the city itself has fallen into corruption and decay.


12

From Wikipedia: In Batman (1989), Billy Dee Williams appears as a Harvey Dent before his disfigurement, vowing to reduce crime by locking up mob boss Carl Grissom. Williams was set to reprise the character as Two-Face in the sequels, but the Harvey Dent character was deleted from the script for the sequel Batman Returns (1992), and Batman Forever (1995) ...


9

I agree with @HarrisWeinstein that they are suits of armor, and the batsuit is Bruce Wayne's "suit of armor". But they also look intimidating: some have deadly spikes sticking out, one has terrifying protruding eyes, another has "wings" and a death grimace. The batsuit is designed to intimidate batman's opponents; that's why Bruce Wayne chose bats in the ...


6

Joker used to be a big time mobster Jack Napier. These don't usually run around killing kids' parents (or, if they do, kids are unlikely to survive that). So, it's not hard for him to realize that this must have happened when he was a thug, i.e., when he was young. Notice how he first asks "What are you talking about?" and only after that says that he was ...


6

From Wikipedia: Harley Quinn first appeared in the Batman: The Animated Series episode "Joker's Favor", as what was originally supposed to be the animated equivalent of a walk-on role; a number of police officers were to be taken hostage by someone jumping out of a pop out cake, and it was decided that to have the Joker do so himself would be too bizarre (...


6

In universe, the reporters in Batman are always scandalous, speculative, both for and against Batman. Specifically, they are prone to: sen·sa·tion·al·ism. senˈsāSHənlˌizəm/ noun (especially in journalism) the use of exciting or shocking stories or language at the expense of accuracy, in order to provoke public interest or excitement. Gotham ...


6

This shot of the Joker looks to be done with a sort of Screen Printing, a method of printing. The shadows created on the Jokers face look very similar to images created with this technique and would give this same look as his hands do. In this process of Screen Printing, each individual layer and color are printed at a different time helping it look ...


6

I think in order to answer this, you have to carefully examine the character of the Joker and the way in which he phrases things. In addition, Alicia Hunt's mannerisms and the way she talks gives a big clue. First, it's fairly well known that the Joker will lie to achieve his goals. He also has been shown in media to have trouble remembering how events ...


5

Well, Jack Palance played mob boss Carl Grissom in that film. And in this particular Batman movie, Grissom tries to have Jack Napier/The Joker killed, leading to the deformations that give the Joker his signature perma-smile and green hair. So, the Joker is out for revenge on Grissom, and as you noted, the man in the video does look an awful lot like Jack ...


5

Tim Burton chose to use Jack Napier as the killer, because it creates more of a bond between Batman and his nemesis. This was based on the 1988 graphic novel Batman: The Killing Joke in which Batman and Joker are seen as mirror images of each other. In fact, the origin of the Joker as a victim of a fall into a vat of chemical waste in Burton's version was ...


5

Before the rise of CGI a lot of post production effects were done by a process called rotoscoping Here the film is projected onto a glass screen frame by frame to allow an animator to draw over each frame onto a transparency which could then be overlaid onto the original film and re exposed to create a new combined image, a process similar to cel animation....


3

I have always seen this as foreshadowing of Batman as an armoured but somewhat fantastical figure and they could be seen as Bruce Wayne's inspiration for the bat suit. It is worth noting that while they are clearly based on real wold armour they all have a bit of a fantasy spin. For example looking at the smaller images from left to right the first is a ...


2

Maybe the henchmen were hiding up there according to some devious plan concocted by the Joker. The Joker might have wanted Batman to follow him into a trap.


2

Yes. While we don't know if the Joker physically threw her over, if we believe his claim she threw her self over because of his new outlook on life, he is still involved. He drove her to suicide. He scarred her. He scared her. He had violent tendencies and is very possessive. She killed herself because of him, which would make him criminally liable for ...


1

I do remember this from 1989's movie and as pointed out in an answer to your previous question itself, those armours are special armour collected from various cultures, which make Batman look intimidating. It(the armours and ancient weapons) might be part of Batman's research or probably Bruce's hobby. Or it maybe purely for the gothic look. The movie was ...


1

Possibly, as it does subvert the viewers expectations as to the outcome of that final showdown, but remember - at the time the scene was conceived and photographed no body could foresee the upcoming tragedy involving Ledger and it is possible that the character was kept alive for possible future use in the sequel.


1

They're both technically true, as each adaptation has its own official canon. The canon with Billy Dee Williams as Harvey Dent continues on from the first two Tim Burton films, with Tommy Lee Jones taking over the role as Two-Face in Batman Forever. Billy Dee Williams was initially intended to portray Harvey Dent post-mutilation, but the role was given to ...


1

Artistic freedom allows him to do this. Besides, those early superhero worlds were 100% white. It may have been considered tasteless to have a black character play a villain, which could have been construed as racist by all those happy race-baiters. If you're saying Dent appeared in an earlier Batman movie (I don't really recall those Burton ones too well....


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