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91

It does appear to be true. UK newspaper The Independent looked at this legend shortly after Hurt's death and cites an old issue of Empire magazine. It all started with Scott's desire for genuine reactions of terror. "[They] were going to be the most difficult thing. If an actor is just acting terrified, you can't get the genuine look of raw, animal ...


44

From alienseries, the producer blamed it on availability: In 1986 Bobbie Wygant asked Aliens producer Gale Anne Hurd if Scott had turned down the opportunity to direct the sequel. “I’m not really sure,” Hurd answered. “I know that he was in post-production on Legend at the time we were in pre-production [on Aliens], so perhaps it was a result of his ...


43

Note that the scene where Brett is taken has some significant alterations in the DC compared to the Theatrical Cut, as described in this Wikia: Immediately after Brett is taken, the theatrical version shows a closeup of Jones nonchalantly watching as Brett's screams fade. The Director's Cut instead shows Ripley and Parker running into the room in response ...


37

We don't know. Gale Anne Hurd said in 1986 I’m not really sure. I know that he was in post-production on Legend at the time we were in pre-production [on Aliens], so perhaps it was a result of his availability Ridley told The Hollywood Interview in 2008 They didn’t ask me! To this day I have no idea why. It hurt my feelings, really, because I thought ...


31

Prometheus and Alien deliberately share a lot of themes, as well as the same universe, but they are not directly prequel and sequel (spoilers follow...) The Space Jockey in Alien is old enough to be fossilised. Possibly by the same events that wiped out the Engineers in Prometheus (2000 years ago according to Shaw's carbon dating) but too close to Alien's ...


26

From the Prometheus IMDb FAQ: It should be noted that AvP franchise is not considered part of the official canon of the Alien saga [...] Prometheus is considered by both Ridley Scott and the film's producers to be the first film in the Alien series. From an interview with Damon Lindelof: [...] Look, as to what’s canon and what’s not canon, for me ...


24

The moon visited by the Prometheus, called LV-223, is not the same planet visited by the Nostromo in Alien, which is called LV-426. I believe that the latter was not named on screen until the second film, Aliens. So they are two different Engineer ships and two different dead Engineers. Similarly, the distress call/warning intercepted by the Nostromo was ...


24

How it might work in real life (in the far distant future): Scientists like Mark Roth have studied suspended animation by starting with cases of spontaneous suspended animation, like the Canadian toddler who survived 2 hours of bitter cold in a nappy, the Japanese man who survived 23 days in the cold with no food or water, and the 29-year-old skier found ...


22

The heads of Fox (which owned Alien) changed between the two movies. The previous heads didn't believe a sequel would be profitable. When Fox's interest in a sequel was reborn, they first needed a script and looked for a writer, and Scott does not write screenplays. Fox development executive Larry Wilson thought Cameron would be good to write the sequel ...


21

Yes, the ships are capable of speeds significantly above the speed of light. From in-movie clues this is fairly clear, e.g. from Alien dialog: DALLAS: How far to Earth. LAMBERT: Ten months. Then later in the meeting they have: DALLAS: Well, some of you may have figured out we're not home yet. We're only halfway there. So the journey they are ...


21

So, canonically, it is uncertain whether or not the Xenomorphs actually eat, or if they are just powered by their blood, but there are certain examples in the movies which we can refer to to determine whether or not they actually eat. In Alien we don't see much of the Xenomorph's behavior beyond it attacking. It can be noted that it does kill with its ...


18

She was a fighter, giving in and commiting suicide was not in her nature. Have a look at her in Aliens, insisting on being taught how to use the grenade launcher, returning the loader to fight the queen etc. The alien moved around the ship and although it was blocking her way out at the moment it would probably move, it was just a matter of her not getting ...


16

As Wikipedia says - Prometheus was originally intended as a direct prequel to the 1979 science fiction horror film Alien, set approximately 30 years before the events depicted in the film. While the finished film explored a more stand-alone mythology based upon the race of giant beings discovered by the crew of the Nostromo in Alien, it is, as ...


15

Here is a nice interview with a large portion of the original filmmakers, in which they discuss how Ash is drinking milk. From what I can ascertain, the androids in this film series can indeed drink fluids - but in this case it seems to be a precursor for a later gag in which Ash sweats a white fluid in an approximation of an 'android orgasm'. From an ...


14

Cracked.com is a great place to find false information. I wouldn't recommend taking them too seriously, but that article is correct about Alien. "Good artists copy. Great artists steal." Dan O'Bannon explicitly stated in an essay he stole elements from those movies (it's available on the Alien special features disc). So it is really the script that ...


13

I'd say they may be loosely connected. Paul W.S. Anderson was the producer on Death Race 2, Death Race, and Alien vs. Predator. It's likely that including Weyland Corporation in Death Race 2 was an homage or in-joke, but there's nothing to say that it's not the same company (and therefore the films share the same universe). It's also worth noting that ...


11

Yes, either the ships can travel at theoretical speeds beyond that of light or they can enter and exit "warp" or "hyperspace" corridors which allow travel across vast areas of space in far less than time than traveling at or near light speed would. Some clues from the 19780 novelization of the film Alien and the subsequent Alien films are: In the ...


10

AvP is not canon. From here: the promotional website Weyland Industries retconned the AvP movies from the canon by having Peter Weyland (Guy Pearce, pictured below) as the founder of Weyland Corp, as opposed to having AVP's Charles Bishop Weyland (Lance Henriksen) as the founder of Weyland Industries. Ridley Scott also doesn't consider AvP a part of the ...


8

Ridley Scott has stated clearly before this movie was released that it is not a prequel to the Alien film. It takes place almost a hundred years before LV-426 is found. With that said, Ridley Scott has talked about making a trilogy of the Prometheus films. We can assume that the strange looking xenomorph shown at the end of Prometheus is an early ancestor ...


7

The answer seems much more obvious than comparing moons and what not. At the end, David informs Elizabeth Shaw that: 'There are many more ships'. In Alien, it's just another ship with another Engineer.


7

I have always taken from the films that Ash is drinking Android blood, or a fluid needed to support their systems. It is a consumable bio fluid that needs to be replenished as part of their regular maintenance. We know that their blood is white as seen in Alien, Aliens and Prometheus. The only possible exception is in Aliens 3, when actor Lance Henrickson ...


7

As explained on the Xenopedia wikia: Eggmorphing was originally to be witnessed during the climax of Alien, when Ripley discovers Dallas and Brett cocooned in the Nostromo's hold, with Brett being transformed into an Egg. The entire sequence was cut as director Ridley Scott felt it slowed down the final act of the film. However, the scene did ...


6

That certainly could be an explanation for why Ash adds "Yes?" at the end of many of his sentences. However, I believe there are at least a couple instances in the film where he says, "Yes?" at the end of a sentence that does not contain a lie. Also, his mission on the spacecraft is solely to preserve the Xenomorph and return it to The Company who sent the ...


5

After watching both Prometheus and Alien: Covenant (links to IMDb pages), the answer appears to be a combination of factors (WARNING: Spoilers for both movies follow, but as they are the entire substance of the answer, they are not wrapped in spoiler tags): The black "goo" containing some type of parasitic life form created by the Engineers for whatever ...


5

You are assuming that all the engineers were wiped out with David's attack. This is obviously not the case though since we know that the Engineers have been colonizing worlds and setting up bases from the movie Prometheus. Further we don't even know if all the Engineers are dead on the planet in Covenant. We just know one of the cities and probably several ...


4

Both are great, great films, you're gonna want to watch them multiple times so it really doesn't matter where you start. Even watching them in reverse order doesn't matter, I saw Aliens first and it possibly made Alien even more intriguing. You cannot go wrong - there are no bad versions. However, assuming you do watch them more than once, start with the ...


3

This is the very question I had after seeing Alien: Covenant. How to get from end of Covenant to Start of Alien? If the narrative is that David created the Face hugger & Xenomorph that we all know and love then this creates a huge continuity error given the mural on the wall in Prometheus is ‘our’ Xenomorph. I think the comment by Alex is interesting in ...


3

The flyover scene at the beginning showed green areas as well as lots of rock and water meaning there was at least plant life on the planet before they seeded. Maybe they were adding roses to the garden. If it was a few million years ago, all they had to do was "engineer" a way to nudge us in the humanoid direction and see what happens...the soup was at the ...


3

To be perfectly honest, this is a highly debated question (not just about the movie) and is open to several interpretations. While we were shown that the engineers seeded life in the first scene of the movie, it might not even have been earth. While the seed of life was created from engineer DNA, it can be interpreted that when the engineer broke down, it ...


3

From the book of Alien ISTR that hyper sleep is just a very deep sleep and you dream in the same way as you normally would only more vividly due to the deeper sleep and longer time spent in it. However, you do not need food or water (or at least do not seem to). Hence one can be in hyper sleep for long periods (Ripley managed 57 years) without serious ...


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