59

Enforcement is perhaps not the word. Although the movie studios had considerable sway and influence over theatre owners at the time they could not insist that the owners maintain the policy of "no late admission". It's possible that they could have included a clause into the contracts to this effect but it seems that the studio went for persuasion ...


19

In 1962 François Truffaut interviewed Alfred Hitchcock rather extensively. About 12 hours of audio has been broadcast on french radio. You can listen to the 25 parts here. In part 15 Hitchcock talks about "Rope" (I transcribed it myself, so please excuse any errors): I don't know why I really indulged in the stunt, I can only call it a stunt, in &...


10

To add to Christian Rau's answer, here is an outtake from Wikipedia: When filming Rope (1948), Alfred Hitchcock intended for the film to have the effect of one long continuous take, but the cameras available could hold no more than 1000 feet of 35 mm film. As a result, each take used up to a whole roll of film and lasts up to 10 minutes. Many takes end ...


9

I think that the long takes, or just a single take as it should look for the audience, fit perfectly to the fact that the whole movie is set at a single small place. Those two aspects contribute to the impression that we are actually watching a play instead of a movie (as also stated in this answer to a different question). To me this had two at first ...


9

Foremost Hitchcock critic Robin Wood has written two books on Hitchcock’s films which are available through your local library’s InterLibrary Loan (ILL) service if you live in the US (and a number of other countries as well): Hitchcock's Films (1977) and Hitchcock's Films Revisited (1989). He also wrote several essays in the book A Hitchcock Reader (...


5

The detective is trying to make sense of the picture, as detectives are tasked with trying to make sense of things in any given case. The picture could also be seen as a representation of Lina's frazzled state of mind.


4

This is only a partial answer, but I hope it is of help. The source seems to be François Truffaut, who conducted interviews with Alfred Hitchcock in 1962 and later published a book (even later turned into a film), called Hitchcock/Truffaut. I didn't find the direct quote, e. g. the original audio files from 1962 are online, but I couldn't locate the exact ...


4

As per the Trivia page for "Frenzy" on IMDB: Midway through the film, there is a famous continuous shot in which the camera backs away from the door of Rusk's upper-floor apartment and descends the staircase, seemingly without a cut, to the ground level, out the building's front door, and then to the opposite side of the street. The interiors were shot ...


4

I believe this is a short from 1973 called Norman Nurdelpick's Suspension: A Tribute to Alfred Hitchcock. I can't seem to find a clip of it anywhere. However, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Science (e.g. the Oscars, The Academy Awards, etc) started a Student Academy Awards in 1973. A full list of winners can be found here and Norman Nurdelpick's ...


4

I watched The Lady Vanishes this afternoon, followed by several hours of perusing databases and books about Hitchcock, and it is difficult to answer your question with any sense of definition because 1) Hitchcock never gave an interview about the film, and 2) he shot it as written, so the result is a mix of his influence with the writers' influence. HOWEVER,...


3

While Hartz may have been a construct based on Lashley, according to TCM, with small changes to the beginning and ending, Hitchcock directed the film as it had been written by Sidney Gilliat and Frank Launder. Any construct would have been theirs: Hitchcock was trying to find a film to end his contract with [Edward] Black so he could sign a deal with ...


3

My first reaction was it was done with Steadicam, except Frenzy came out in 1972 and Steadicam was first used in 1976. I found a good description of how the shot was done here: "Deconstructing the Tracking Shot". A camera jib was used for the interior shot, and a dolly ws used for the exterior. There is actually an edit in the shot, hidden by the man ...


2

It's a very quick clip, but I think he leans left just after he steps back. That's just enough to give that effect. I don't think it's intentional. If you watch the entire shot, the shadow is in-frame for the duration and there is no room to have placed another actor to effect a separate shadow. It has to be real. Best guess is that as he steps back, his ...


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