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112 votes

In the "300" movie, in the final battle, Why didn't Leonidas kill Xerxes?

Because Leonidas and Xerxes were actual historical figures that have well documented histories. Xerxes lived through the battle. Also The Battle of Thermopylae is a well-documented event. Taking ...
John's user avatar
  • 8,542
42 votes
Accepted

Why does the Persian emissary display a string of crowned skulls?

From what I remember, they are the skulls of Kings and Sovereigns that had refused to submit / 'offer Earth and Water' to Xerxes. Leonidas: [...] No man, Persian or Greek, no man threatens ...
Stephen Francis's user avatar
35 votes

In the "300" movie, in the final battle, Why didn't Leonidas kill Xerxes?

Because Xerxes believed himself to be a god, immortal and immune to physical injury, and his army believed it as well. Leonidas intentionally injures Xerxes, rather than killing him, to serve a major ...
DForck42's user avatar
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31 votes

In the "300" movie, in the final battle, Why didn't Leonidas kill Xerxes?

While I agree with other users that the throw was in fact very hard, and that Leonidas pulled an impressive stunt even with that minor injury, I think there's a point in particular that needs to be ...
Simone's user avatar
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20 votes

In the "300" movie, in the final battle, Why didn't Leonidas kill Xerxes?

Because it's a spear, manually thrown from a great distance, affected by wind, how well the spear was built, etc. It's not a round fired from a scoped and adjusted sniper rifle on a mounted stand, ...
PoloHoleSet's user avatar
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18 votes

In the "300" movie, in the final battle, Why didn't Leonidas kill Xerxes?

Simply, because Xerxes survived that battle. The movie was based on actual events; The Hot Gates existed, the Greeks (Spartans) were betrayed by a resident (Ephialtes) who told the Persians about the ...
Johnny Bones's user avatar
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15 votes
Accepted

How did Xerxes appear so much larger than Leonidas?

Just Bluescreen and movie magic. This scene can be seen in the extras, and shows normal sized Santoro caressing normal sized Butler's shoulders, against the blue screen: ...
cde's user avatar
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14 votes
Accepted

How deep is the hole in Sparta?

As I'm sure you are aware, the movie 300 (2006) was not meant to be historically accurate, and was based on a graphic novel rather than an actual history tome. In reality: Darius sent emissaries ...
Johnny Bones's user avatar
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3 votes

What culture is Xerxes' attire in 300 actually based on?

You can view in Ruins of Persepolis Xerxes's outfits (below) which have ring and necklace name of Xerxes I was written in three languages and carved on the entrances, informing everyone that he ...
Ori Marko's user avatar
  • 1,056
3 votes

What culture is Xerxes' attire in 300 actually based on?

This might be better suited to the Comic Book stack. This is what the real Xerxes looked like: https://turtledove.fandom.com/wiki/Xerxes_I_of_Persia?file=XerxesI.jpg Based on info from this "...
Johnny Bones's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

In the "300" movie, in the final battle, Why didn't Leonidas kill Xerxes?

Leonidas did not miss the shot. Instead Leonidas did not kill Xerxes because he had to respect the Carnea - the ancient greek festival during which Sparta wages no war (Recall the scene where he goes ...
Kenny Barrera's user avatar
2 votes

Why does Xerxes think he's a god?

Actually, He had never considered himself a god. They were Zoroastrian (a religion that still exists in Iran and is considered to be monotheistic and acceptable by the Iranian Islamic government) and ...
Farnaz Shahriari's user avatar
1 vote

What was the significance of the necklace?

The film's screenplay has a bit more info about what's going on in this scene. Dilios begins to turn and then slows. DILIOS: Sire, any message...? LEONIDAS: For the Queen? Leonidas is gone. ...
Valorum's user avatar
  • 20.2k
1 vote

What was the significance of the necklace?

I don't think any of these quite nail it, and it is kind of an awesome plot point. Part of the Spartan culture, that was somewhat addressed in the movie, was the concept of "come back with your ...
Pete B.'s user avatar
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