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70

That all depends on how big the artillery shell was. A standard 75mm/18lb shell would have difficulty making a hole anywhere near that big, but the largest shell fired in WWI was 3,130 lbs! used by the 520mm French Schneider Howitzer... Somewhat more portable were the 24cm or 25cm Schwerer Flügelminenwerfer* which carried a 200 lb charge… *Roughly ...


58

Possibly the result of an underground bomb, placed there by miners: One of the common techniques used in warfare during the First World War was mining. There were various mines planted under trenches, then detonated to send part of the trench, and anyone in it, sky high. The BBC also did an article on this. National Geographic says of the Messine ...


53

Similar techniques were used in Birdman which was also visualised as a single shot, and the opening scene of The Revenant. Usually, if you're looking out for them you can see the wipes they use - watch for someone crossing camera in such a way as they completely cover the shot, or in Birdman, they used transitions between rooms, covered by CGI to keep the ...


31

Quoting from Wikipedia under filming section. Filming was accomplished with long takes and elaborately choreographed moving camera shots to give the effect of one continuous take. Careful editing was employed to trick the viewer’s eye into thinking they were watching films unfolding in one unbroken take. (source) Sam Mendes explained it quite well ...


24

There are two different questions in your question. 1. Why did Will trade his medal for wine? The answer to this is clearly given by Will. Will: I didn't lose mine. Blake: What happens to it then? Will: Why do you care? Blake: Why do you not? Will: I swapped it with a French Captain. Blake: Swapped it?! Will: Uh-huh! Blake: For what? Will: Bottle of wine. ...


21

Given all you see is the crater, there's no guarantee it was made by a single shell, though the odds are statistically high it was a shell given how many were fired. The biggest crater created still exists today in 2020, 104 years after it was created. The crater is 30 metres deep and 100 metres across (98 feet and 330 feet) and was caused by a 2,700 ...


19

In addition to the incredibly heavy shells that could be lofted by the artillery of either side, delayed fuzes were used which trigger a few seconds after impact, causing the shell to explode under the surface, pushing the ground advice up and out, and creating craters as deep and wide as you see in the picture you posted. Since proximity fuzes, which would ...


16

From the script (pdf): LIEUTENANT LESLIE (CONT'D) If you do get shot, try to make it back to the wire. We won’t come after you, not until it’s dark. And, if by some fucking miracle you do make it, send up a flare. So they are instructed by the Lieutenant to send up a flare if they 'make it', i.e. they get to the German line, which means that ...


15

Will earned his medal fighting in the Somme, over a million men were killed or wounded during the fight making it one of the bloodiest battle in human history [Wikipedia entry]. Medals are often prized by soldiers but he comments that "its just a bit of tin". To him the medal is meaningless, he doesn't take pride in being a part of that battle and would ...


10

Yes, it's quite realistic In fact, we know from records of the time that swearing was extremely common among the British armed forces in World War I, for example It became so common that an effective way for the soldier to express this emotion was to omit this word. Thus if a sergeant said, 'Get your ----ing rifles!' it was understood as a matter of routine....


9

I believe that is called a Beacon Army Light and just from cursory google searches on the topic the movies seems to be authentic to the time in terms of flash light technology. Also found this one that looks like it says they last around 5 hours pretty neat!


9

Yes (sort of) As Matt's answer quite fairly notes, this predates the earliest known usage of the term "fuck off" specifically, so it'd be unlikely that an officer would use that exact language. However, it is certainly not the case that the language would be too "boorish and unprofessional" for an upper-class gentleman. The vocabulary of ...


8

As mentioned by BCdotWeb, the song is a well known gospel/folk song "The Poor Wayfaring Stranger" which talks about the difficulty of life and the hope of a heaven beyond. The lyrics would be very appropriate for anyone looking death in the face, especially during a battle where one is on the front line, as was the case of the men in the movie. They were ...


7

Most of the movie is filmed with 8-9 minutes long scenes and then edited to make it look as a continuous shot. Sometimes they pass the camera behind some objects (I remember some rocks and buildings) and cut the scene, then they can continue with the next scene without the audience noticing the cut. There's an article with most of the process explained.


7

As you probably noticed in the trailer - there is no one in those trenches. This is what made World War I so tragic. When front could be moved it wasn't because the order wasn't given. And, worse, the orders were given when the attack was doomed. Now, the War of the Trenches was fought in that manner. One day the Germans moves 100 metres, taking english ...


6

The first known use of "fuck off" dates back to 1929, according to Merriam-Webster. Of course this does not rule out that the term may have been used a bit earlier but it is unlikely that people used it 12 years earlier and nobody wrote it down for many years, or if such records existed, that they all vanished. By the way, the phrase "fuck up&...


5

Sure, he's saying that one [or two] can travel faster than a squad. But why quote Kipling? It's in character for a military officer of the time. Classical education. This type of quote, off the cuff being able to fit a literary quote to a given situation is a kind of 'verbal armoury' of sorts. This type of education and upbringing would arm such a person ...


5

General Erinmore chose him on purpose because of the fact that Blake's brother was in the same regiment who was going to be pushed forward. Blake will be motivated to somehow get to his brother's regiment and deliver message to save them all. Following are dialogues from tent briefings at beginning of movie. SERGEANT SANDERS: Lance Corporals Blake and ...


5

According to the script, Starting on Page 51: The Pilot’s legs are on fire. PILOT Meine beine! Meine beine! Hilf mir! Hilf mir! PILOT My legs! My legs! Help me! Help me! EXT. REAR FRENCH FARMHOUSE - CONTINUOUS Schofield and Blake drag the pilot by his shoulders - the true extent of his injuries laid bare in the daylight. The flames have done bad damage. ...


4

They look the same because both sides are fighting the same type of war When militaries are stuck in static trench warfare, there is strong selective pressure to develop defences that work, otherwise you run out of soldiers fairly quickly and you lose. Given the level of technology at the time, both sides would have developed similar techniques. That is why ...


4

It is a bit too big for an artillery shell. Others have shown the artillery pieces, and the mine craters. But few people today have any idea of how much the heavy artillery of the day churned up the landscape in general. The earth was pounded over and over for months, which means that eventually it was just a thick layer of mud (which got displaced even ...


4

It's clear from the Blake's and Schofield's conversation much later in movie that Schofield didn't liked going back home. It's the conversation when they are talking about exchanging medal for wine bottle. I hated going home. I hated it. When I knew I couldn't stay, when I knew I had to leave and they might never see 'em...


4

The French town of Ecoust was on fire even before Lance Corporal William Schofield crossed the canal via the broken bridge. This is evident from the drifting smoke1 visible to Schofield as he observed the town's ruins for a moment, before crossing the canal. This indicates that the (possible) aerial bombing happened before Schofield's arrival. When Schofield ...


3

As you have mentioned, It appeared that this village is still being held by Germans (albeit not many of them) who are now effectively behind enemy lines, as the Central powers had retreated, and the Allied powers were advancing British soldiers were not completely sure that Germans were retreating. That's why they even held lines from where Blake and ...


3

It is "The Wayfaring Stranger" a well-known American folk and gospel song [...] about a plaintive soul on the journey through life. Judging from the lyrics it seems rather appropriate for the situation those soldiers are in.


3

I think that the answer is that it was the best possible route based on their intelligence. At that moment in time they had to trust the information that they had at hand, both that the ambush had been set and that the Germans had ordered a full retreat. They had to assume that it was entirely abandoned, or even if there were scouts or snipers still left ...


3

You can use the British Battle of the Somme from 1916 to get an idea of how combat charges took place in World War I. Ultimately, there was a fair amount of time before the first wave and the second wave. During the Somme the time between charges could as long as 45 minutes because each charge itself were so massive. This meant that troops in the first wave ...


2

From memory: they are not similar at all, apart from both being trenches. The British trench is built from wood and sandbags mostly. The German trench has concrete lining its walls. The main characters enter a sleeping area and are amazed by the size of the dugout and comment on this. They are impressed by the Germans having real beds to sleep on. Earlier ...


2

this time next week it'll be chicken dinner. Yes, he's saying that Blake will be having proper meals while on leave. It's easier not to go back at all. This one is a little more vague but my interpretation is that going home is great but you still have to come back and that is incredibly depressing. So it's better not going so you don't have the ...


2

In addition to the answers above, the song was likely selected as Schofield is not just facing death, but believes he may already be dead. The script explains how Schofield views the soldiers: EXT. PINE WOOD - CONTINUOUS Shafts of morning light stream through the pine trees. Schofield walks towards the music. Uncertain if it is real. The music is ...


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