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In episode 3.01 (More Than Ever, We Care About You) of Amazon Prime Video TV series, The Man in the High Castle, the titular character, also known as Abendsen Hawthorn, and his wife Caroline, explain to Juliana (and the audience) a bit of his origin story for how he became 'The Man in the High Castle'.

CAROLINE: Word got around that Hawthorne was some sort of prophet of the Resistance, which he wasn't.

ABENDSEN: No. Not at first. That's because the real films started coming to our door.

CAROLINE: Travelers like Trudy would bring them from their worlds, - and then, the Resistance would get them to us.

Perhaps it was stated later in the season and I missed it or maybe it hasn't been answered yet, but my question is,

How did the travelers/couriers know what universe to take the films to?

As a follow up question, do we know if they have a much of a choice to where they can travel to?


(And yes I'm aware that they can only travel to a universe where their

counterparts have died.)

I'm just looking for an answer beyond that.

  • 1
    Maybe death of their counterpart created a void in that particular parallel universe and they are sucked into it, like a piece of paper gets sucked in vacuum cleaner. – Rahul Feb 28 '19 at 9:00
  • @Rahul that's a good theory, except for instances where there could be a lot of parallel universes were counterparts cease to exist. There would then have to be either an explanation like some voids are deeper than others or some parallel universes are closer to each other. I mean within the narrative of the show, they definitely make a point about quantum entanglement and use Kintsugi as a metaphor that perhaps they go were they can "fix" personal problems and get information. – Darth Locke Feb 28 '19 at 13:06
  • I think it's simply by law of averages. The universe with the mass genocides has the greatest number of available spots for travellers to come through. – OrangeDog Nov 30 '19 at 0:32
  • Not necessarily because the time lines aren't perfectly parallel...In season 2 for instance, we see a film that is "futuristic" by comparison and it faced even greater genocide, than the prime reality as San Francisco was bombed, but yet it somehow got to our universe before that history could repeat. But we don't know if every time is it's own universe or if there could possibly also be "iterations" of any given universe, which also happens to be the case in Fringe. – Darth Locke Nov 30 '19 at 0:42

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