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Okay, so I know he can sense other spiders nearby in The Amazing Spider-Man, but is he bothered by them? I read somewhere that a lot of spiders attack other spiders quite frequently, some even going so far as to try to eat them, so I was just wondering if Peter were to see another spider, would he freak out? Would he instinctively kill it?

Apparently it's both human and spider instinct to kill another spider, so I'm thinking that he probably would, but I'm not positive. I'm mostly wondering about Tom Holland's version of Spider-Man, but any kind of answer would suffice.

closed as primarily opinion-based by A J, J M, Paulie_D, Todd Wilcox, Meat Trademark Jun 28 '18 at 16:16

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    It would be better if you provide evidence that spiders attack spiders. Link "I read somewhere" – KharoBangdo Jun 28 '18 at 7:18
  • In the comics, when Spider-Man first meets the Avengers (Avengers (1964) #10, I think), we learn that Janet van Dyne, a.k.a. the Wasp, is uncomfortable around Spider-Man because she hates spiders. I think the possibility that this is related to her powers may be left open, but it doesn't seem likely. Interestingly enough, her step-daughter, Nadia (the new Wasp introduced in 2015) had the same reaction. – RDFozz Jun 28 '18 at 22:36
  • @KharoBangdo: wikiwand.com/en/Spider_cannibalism. Female spiders sometimes eat the male after copulation, hence the name of the Black widow. – Taladris Dec 13 '18 at 17:00
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There is nothing at all to suggest so in any of the cinematic incarnations so far, as while Peter clearly has a 'spider sense' I do not believe that he or any other humans have a 'natural instinct' to kill spiders (notwithstanding arachnophobes). Although many people do kill small harmless animals for no reason, I do not believe (or perhaps hope?) that it is a default setting of the human condition and as Peter is specifically shown time and time again to try and live up to the most selfless of his human values (which always trump whatever influence the spider DNA has on his personality) I would think that he is probably even less likely than most to be so unnecessarily cruel.

In Sam Raimi's Spider-man, there is a clear shot of wonder as Peter looks up towards a spider building a web in the alley, immediately prior to his realisation that he now posses the same abilities. He certainly does not go out of his way to kill it before attempting to crawl up the alley wall for the first time.

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