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Firstly, I have no idea how far Asgard is away from Earth in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Thor, and other characters have used Bifrost as an express elevator to other worlds, but I have no real idea of how far they've traveled and how long those trips have taken.

Have there been cases where Thor (or someone else) has traveled to/from/back to Earth or another world that allows us to infer the speed of Bifrost?

Or is there something in-universe in the movies/comics that tells us?

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    What kind of answer are you hoping for ... the speed is going to be something ridiculous .... orders of magnitude faster than the speed of light as although its not instantaneous it only takes a few moments to travel between stars. Travel in a minute to our nearest neighboring star is a speed about 2.3 million times the speed of light. The bifrost takes people apparently further in that kind of apparent timeframe. – iandotkelly May 21 '18 at 14:01
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    for all intents and purposes, it's almost instant. – DustinDavis May 21 '18 at 15:17
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    If the speed of Bifrost travel is not instantaneous, it has a measurable speed. Maybe it takes the same time to travel any distance. But if it takes longer to travel farther it has a measurable speed. There is a big difference between one billion times the speed of light and one million times the speed of light - one is a thousand times as fast as the other. So Snow's question is perfectly valid and can have a mathematically valid answer, unless the MCU movies simply don't give enough evidence to give more than the minimum possible speed. – M. A. Golding May 22 '18 at 19:43
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    Marvel Wikia and MCU Wikia states that bifrost travels are instantaneous.. – Ero Sɘnnin Jun 4 '18 at 6:39
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    @EroSɘnnin That's a bit problematic considering in Thor Ragnarok we see an extended scene of Thor and Loki traveling through the bifrost before being ejected from it at different points. If it were instantaneous, there'd be no opportunity for them to get ejected part way through at random places... at least not in the manner that the movie depicted. The Wikias probably state that because some fan added it in. – TylerH Mar 12 at 14:38
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Actually it may have not only speed but time involved in the equation. In Thor series, the Bifrost is some kind of worm-whole, an Einstein-rosen bridge. It certainly is not a teleport, because you have to be disassembled in teleporting. So it has speed, and according to Wikipedia :

Wormholes might allow effective superluminal (faster-than-light) travel by ensuring that the speed of light is not exceeded locally at any time. While traveling through a wormhole, subluminal (slower-than-light) speeds are used. If two points are connected by a wormhole whose length is shorter than the distance between them outside the wormhole, the time taken to traverse it could be less than the time it would take a light beam to make the journey if it took a path through the space outside the wormhole. However, a light beam traveling through the same wormhole would of course beat the traveler.

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