8

In the movie Up in the Air, starring George Clooney, there's the following dialogue:

Alex: I'll say. I put up pretty pedestrian numbers. 60 thousand a year, domestic.

Ryan: That's not bad.

Alex: Don't patronize me. What's your total?

Ryan: It's a personal question.

Alex: Please.

Ryan: And we hardly know each other.

Alex: Come on, show some hubris. Come on, impress me. I bet it's huge.

Ryan: You have no idea.

Alex: How big? What is it, this big? This big?

Ryan: I don't want to brag.

Alex: Oh, come on! Come on.

Ryan: Let's just say I have a number in mind and I haven't hit it yet.

I'm not quite sure what this means. Is it talking about how many people they've slept with or mileage or something else?

  • 1
    The quote includes "60 thousand a year" and you think it might be "how many people they've slept with"? – Anthony Grist Jun 7 '18 at 10:12
15

More context here helps. Here's what precedes this exchange:

Alex: [going through each others wallets] Oh, my God. I wasn't sure this actually existed. This is the American Airlines...

Ryan: It's a Concierge Key, yeah.

Alex: What is that, carbon fibre?

Ryan: Graphite.

Alex: Oh, I love the weight.

Ryan: I was pretty excited the day that bad boy came in.

Alex: I'll say. I put up pretty pedestrian numbers. 60 thousand a year, domestic.

Ryan: That's not bad.

And here's what follows:

Ryan: Let's just say I have a number in mind and I haven't hit it yet.

Alex: This is pretty f[***]ing sexy.

Ryan: Hope it doesn't cheapen our relationship.

Alex: We're two people who get turned on by elite status. I think cheap is our starting point.

In context, then: they are talking about their elite status in frequent flyer programs. Alex & Ryan are both characters who travel a lot for their jobs; Ryan has been doing this job for many years, and has accrued a super-elite status on some airlines. Alex is impressed by this. "Sixty thousand a year, domestic" refers to earning 60,000 miles per year on domestic travel—which would be quite a lot for most people, but is "pedestrian" (i.e., humdrum, unremarkable) by Alex's own standards.

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