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Did people in Elizabethan London really speak like they do in "Upstart Crow"? I'm specifically thinking of the way Greene says Sirra instead of Sir.

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    You could write a book on the answer to this - & many people have. The Elizabethan era occurred during one of the fastest & certainly largest pronunciation changes in the English language, known as the Great Vowel Shift. Shakespeare's famous "sea change" was at the time a joke, because at the beginning it would have been pronounced "say change", yet by the end would it be pronounced "see change". – disassociated Mar 15 '18 at 18:12
  • Given the 450 years that has elapsed, the English spoken at this time is still very understandable, go back only another 200 years and the English used by Chaucer is almost unrecognizable to the average person as the same language. – iandotkelly Mar 15 '18 at 18:31
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I'm specifically thinking of the way Greene says Sirra instead of Sir.

It's actuallly "Sirrah" and

Yes

Sirrah

  1. (archaic) a contemptuous term used in addressing a man or boy

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition

Examples

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