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I noticed a specific detail when in movies/series characters watch a broadcast in which the subject is the character himself/herself or in which the subject is (in)directly connected to the actions of the character or of interest for the character. The detail is, that before the boadcast has finished completely, the character (or other chracater in the room) turns the TV off suddenly.

I give you an example of a movie I saw today (Gone Girl):

Amy lies in the bed with her former affair Desi. They watch together an interview in which Amy's husband Nick, who was outwited by her (Desi is aware of this but nevertheless helps her), speaks about how much he misses his wife Amy and how much he regrets his mistakes. The interviewer is right about to conclude the interview and narrating further about the case concerning Amy and Nick but before that actually happens, Desi turns the TV off, Amy does not object.

For me, this is a very unnatural and unusual behaviour. If I see a TV broadcast that has caught my attention, I can hardly overcome not turning my device off. I can barely understand how characters can turn off the TV in the midst of a broadcast breaking down a topic which is relevant for the plot and really bothering said characters or even dealing with them directly.

I was checking http://tvtropes.org/ and could not find a trope describing this detail, which astonishes me given the fact how often this detail occurs in TV and movie productions (just watch a few episodes of House of Cards, you will notice it there too).

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    "I can barely understand how characters can turn off the TV in the midst of a broadcast breaking down a topic which is relevant for the plot" Since characters are not aware that they are in a plot, that consideration is moot from their point of view. – Flater Oct 2 '17 at 7:53
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    I'm guessing the out-of-universe reason for this trope is so that the characters can discuss what they just saw without having to talk over the ongoing news report. – F1Krazy Oct 2 '17 at 8:52
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There is no particular name for this trait, but it is usually done to show the character reflecting on the situation, it is a way for the audience to see that the character is experiencing emotions which makes them more down to earth and relatable, therefore we sympathise with them, this engages the audience as when we watch a film, we put ourselves in the characters position and from them showing us this emotion shows they are, at heart, a human like us.

It could also be a cliché for dramatic effect.

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