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There are many movies these days with plot holes in them, such as:

  • The Maze Runner:

the Gladers making their escape into the maze to get out, most run into the maze after the Thomas-Gally encounter, unarmed, the very next scene is they run around a corner in the maze and they are all suddenly armed-no explanation there.

  • Matrix:

It's established that to enter the Matrix, you need an 'operator' in the real world to dial you in and out...so who dialed Cypher when he met with Smith and betrayed the group?

  • The Butterfly Effect:

Ashton Kutcher's goes momentarliy back in time to inflict wounds on his palms in order to convince he is Jesus or something so as to obtain his help. The idea is that the wound simply appear on his palms in front of his cell mate.

Of course this makes no sense in light of the titular butterfly effect-i.e: altering the past in any small way affects everything from that point forward, often drastically, even if he actually ended up in the same prison in the same tme and place, he'd already had the wounds the whole time in his cell mate's memory.

These three movies are good eamples and all have plot holes in them.

Even with professional editing and proof watching, why are there so many plot holes in so many movies these days?

  • WRT The Matrix - I'm not sure if it is a rule that you need an operator - most of the time the humans are in the Matrix, they are trying to act in a clandestine fashion so it makes sense they have an operator outside to assist - but Cypher has arranged a meeting with the agents, and presumably they helped him get a line back out of the Matrix at the end of the meeting – HorusKol Aug 28 '17 at 7:51
  • Re Cypher, there's an answer here - You may want to ask about the other two points if you feel they're plot holes? – Longshanks Aug 28 '17 at 16:07
  • Storyline would not be an editing or proofing thing, I'd think. – PoloHoleSet Dec 14 '17 at 17:51
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Though, this is primarily opinion-based, but I can write some reasons why there are still plot-holes.

1. Budget

They know there is still a plot-hole in the movie, but going back and re-shooting that whole scene can be out-of-budget. Therefore, they skip it.

2. No option

Sometimes, they don't have any choice except leaving the plot mistake as is. They don't know how to close that plot hole without altering the whole story. Therefore, keep it as is.

3. Bank on audience

They also bank on the fact that the audience wouldn't notice it. And most audience doesn't and most get it in second time.

Sometimes, they also explain this plot-hole in subsequent films.

  • 3: Moreover, a plot hole may be deliberate to allow for a sequel to explain or resolve it. – TimSparrow Aug 28 '17 at 11:12
  • Very often, as demonstrated on this site, supposed "plot holes" are not necessarily so. People often mistake parts of stories that they might handle differently as a logical "hole." – PoloHoleSet Dec 14 '17 at 17:52

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