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In season 7 episode 5, Jaime and Bronn emerge from a river, with their armor still on, and with no enemies around.

  1. How did they not drown? At the end of episode 4, we see Jaime sinking in very deep water with his armor still on. It must be impossible to swim with so much armor, particularly if one is tired from a fight.

  2. How did they avoid capture? Many people must've seen Jaime trying to kill Daenerys, yet no one seems to have noticed them swimming (what must've been) less than a minute later.

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    Don't forget that not only did they escape, but they were known to have escaped. Otherwise how does Tyrion think to try meeting with Jaime first thing? The last thing we see from Tyrion's perspective was Jaime rushing headlong into a cone of fire. Jaime was being watched not only by Tyrion but also several Dothraki when he made his charge at Daenerys. While I might believe that Tyrion would look the other way for Jaime, why would the Dothraki? It does seem a rather big plot hole. – zibadawa timmy Aug 14 '17 at 11:24
  • @zibadawatimmy I could see the Dothraki (especially the ones with Tyrion) thinking that Jamie was just a common soldier. But still, someone should've caught them. – Ovi Aug 14 '17 at 11:27
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    Actually, Jamie is wearing a full suit of Plot Armor, rendering him invulnerable to blows and invisible to enemies, while weighing next to nothing! – Nuclear Wang Aug 14 '17 at 13:17
  • @Paulie_D good to know. Although that is surprising. It's just that until now I always saw spoiler blocks in the body of the questions/answers where apropiate and assumed that was the norm. – bolov Aug 14 '17 at 15:56
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    @corsiKa Except for certain people, such as Jaime, Arya, etc. who have routinely ducked death and "What do you mean I'm bleeding like a stuck pig? It's just a flesh wound, I'll be fine to fight off an unwounded, trained assassin and survive"-itis like a fantasy acrobat. And then there are the people who didn't die even when they were killed. – zibadawa timmy Aug 14 '17 at 22:36
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Jaime and Bronn emerge from a river, with their armor still on, and with no enemies around.

How did they not drown? At the end of episode 4, we see Jaime sinking in very deep water with his armor still on. It must be impossible to swim with so much armor, particularly if one is tired from a fight.

Only Jaime is wearing armor and only on the top half of his body. Bronn is not wearing armor..he's wearing leather.

It's not clear that Jaime is wearing actual plate armour. Certainly there is metal in places but it does appear that in many places what he is wearing is leather with metal decorations. This may reduce the overall weight.

We must assume that Bronn brought Jaime to the surface to prevent him drowning. He says that he won't let Jaime die until he gets what he's been promised.

How did they avoid capture? Many people must've seen Jaime trying to kill Daenerys, yet no one seems to have noticed them swimming (what must've been) less than a minute later.

There's no indication of the actual amount of time between episodes although it is right after the battle.

Jaime & Bronn surface some way from the battle...

enter image description here

Again, we must assume, in the absence of any other information, that they swam, perhaps under cover of the smoke and occasionally underwater from the site of the battle to somewhere downstream.

Since, as you say, Jaime is wearing armor, it's quite likely that he kept sinking and Bronn had to keep bringing him back up.

Out of Universe

In TV land of course, what they have is plot armor which prevents them from dying until they are no longer needed.

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    To be fair, the apparent lack of plot armor is one of the main popularity drivers of game of thrones. – FooBar Aug 14 '17 at 12:06
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    @FooBar The apparent lack of plot armor on some characters is just a failure to recognize who the real main characters are. As some one else put it to me "Some main characters are mainer than others". – Shufflepants Aug 14 '17 at 14:40
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    I think this is how we can rationalize it on how it presented. The show assumes everyone has read the books and knows more beyond what we actually see... From what I gather the river is supposed to the "Blackwater Rush" implying a fast current. In the books the Blackfish Tully escapes this way from River Run. If we put these two things together it is possible thats what the show was going for... Although with no explanation... – Skooba Aug 14 '17 at 14:49
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    @Shufflepants I said apparent with good reason. I'll repeat my point to make it clearer. In GoT, plot armor is a worse explanation than elsewhere, because eagles don't unexpectedly appear to save the protagonist. Neither heroes nor villains are not being saved unreasonably from neither pain nor death. – FooBar Aug 14 '17 at 15:15
  • Explanation from tvtropes.org: Therefore, whenever Bob is in a situation where he could be killed (or at the least very seriously injured), he comes out unharmed with no logical, In-Universe explanation., emphasis mine. – FooBar Aug 14 '17 at 15:16
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It is a common misconception that armour makes you unable to swim for two reasons:

  1. it majorly restricts your range of movements

  2. it weighs too much

Those are both wrong. It is very much possible to swim even in the heaviest armour, especially only when wearing just a breastplate (like Jaime). It is more tiring, but it certainly is not as restricting or as heavy as modern fiction portrays it. It is for example, much lighter than a modern soldier's gear. Also, if it restricted your movement heavily, it would seriously impact your ability to fight. It is true that you do not have full freedom, but that's mostly with armour that covers the whole arm and leg. Jaime's is much lighter, and protects mostly his torso and shoulders.

You can check a video here of someone swimming in heavy armour, and you should know it should weigh a bit over 20kgs.

The only thing that would impact Jaime is that he is missing half an arm, but I don't know how that would affect him.

As for the empty battlefield, I would just call it "convenient".

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    As for the empty battlefield I would say they emerged a way away from it. – TheLethalCarrot Aug 14 '17 at 12:43
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    “The only thing that would impact Jaime is that he is missing half an arm” — I thought his hand was cut off pretty much at the wrist, although I may be misremembering the dismembering. – Paul D. Waite Aug 14 '17 at 20:04
  • The heaviest ceremonial armour (and possibly some of the later, more flashy faux-tournament armours, if they were every actually used historically) might be too heavy to swim in, but certainly not any kind of armour you'd actually wear to a battle. In the real battles where "heavy armour" was a decisive disadvantage, it was indeed general fatigue that did them in - and wading not in water, but in mud, which is hard enough to traverse for light troops. +1 – Luaan Aug 14 '17 at 20:29
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    This is the right answer. Armor by itself doesn't weigh that much and its weight is well-distributed over the wearer's body. These guys are also much stronger than the average person in our world; fighting is all they're trained for. Also Jaime (and other nobility) would have trained to fight and move in armor almost since he could walk. – Jay Aug 15 '17 at 7:00
  • The armor may not weigh much, but I bet a solid gold hand that's not good for swimming does... – Taegost Aug 15 '17 at 12:43
5

A couple of points to consider -

Only Jaime is wearing armor.

Most humans are naturally buoyant. SCUBA divers have to wear weights to allow them to sink, so while Jaime clearly sinks from the weight and density of his armor, it's not the same as just dropping a rock. He can move and wouldn't necessarily just be pinned to the bottom of the river.

Bronn is clearly assisting Jaime.

We see them emerge down-river.

If Jaime is dragged to the bottom, initially, why do we assume that they fought their way to the surface and swam from there? Wouldn't it be easier, assuming they could hold their breath for a couple minutes, so head directly to shore moving along the bottom of the riverbed, until they got to shallow enough water to catch gulps of air or finally stand?

Anecdotally - As a former lifeguard, we used to compete in a competition each year where, in one of the events, we had to retrieve a diving brick from the bottom of the deep end, and swim it back to the shallow end of the pool. The other competitors always tried to drag it to the surface, where they could breath, and swim it back. I always just used the weight of the brick to allow me to push off the bottom and essentially leap-frog along the bottom until I got to shallow water. It was much faster than trying to fight and swim at the surface while carrying additional non-buoyant weight. I don't think my competition ever even covered half the distance when I hit the finish line.

If I was Jaime or Bronn and I could see the shoreline within potential reach, I'd gather my legs under me and "dive" horizontally and repeatedly to cover that distance as fast as possible. With Bronn treating Jaime as a "weight" and also leaping at the same time, they cover the distance that much faster.

The added benefit of bottom-level locomotion would be that you would be less likely to be seen swimming and thrashing at the surface for an extended period of time. Remember, when Jaime was last seen he was about to be enveloped in a ball of fire that reduced other humans to ash, literally. From Daenerys's perspective, all she saw was the giant expanding fireball between Drogon and Jaime. That might additionally help them not be noticed if no one considered the idea that there might still be a Jaime (though Tyrion seems to make that assumption, so what do I know?).

  • SCUBA divers have to wear weights to allow them to sink, so while Jamie clearly sinks from the weight and density of his armor, it's not the same as just dropping a rock. Just a tangential note you may or may not know, but the body's buoyancy is not the sole reason SCUBA divers need a weight belt. Wet suits are very buoyant. – jhocking Aug 14 '17 at 16:19
  • @jhocking - except for the leanest of divers, they need weights without wetsuits. They just need more with wetsuits. – PoloHoleSet Aug 14 '17 at 18:16
-1

Everyone believed that the two were incinerated. The dragon wiped out the horses and everything is ash afterwards. Dany never saw him coming and apparently no one else close except Drogon did, either. So, when Drogon lit up the horses, Dany didn't think anything of two roasted horses, as she wouldn't have seen the or heard Jaime or Bronn through the commotion. Anyone who did see Jaime, must have assumed he was roasted and didn't bother to investigate.

However, Jaime's armor should have remained in the ash to note he was killed. So, Tyrion knew Jaime survived, but not until he made his way down to the site where they entered the water. By that time, Jaime and Bronn had emerged and everyone had already moved on.

Jamie then appears in King's landing, though. We are to believe that he and Bronn found a couple of stray horses and went undetected back to King's Landing, which shouldn't have been a problem, as Dany stuck around the battle site to perform the knee-bend ceremony and once Jamie is out of view, he's in Lannister country.

  • Tyrion would not have been obstructed by the dragonfire, but the assumption of surviving had me doubting about the quality of that assumption, on the part of the writers. Maybe it's as simple as him seeing where they would have hit water, and no armor or remains being in that area = alive. Certainly, he'd try to locate his brother's body, armor or remains. – PoloHoleSet Aug 15 '17 at 17:05
  • Just had another thought - What happened in the battle when Lannister soldiers, with armor, for the most part, got roasted, up close, by Drogon (the strafing run where Jaime yells "take cover!")? The wind from Drogon's wings caused their carbonized forms, including the armor, to fall into ashen dust. Maybe they just had leather or hide armor? Whether that's realistic or not.... not my place to say, but we saw in the battle that armor would not necessarily survive. – PoloHoleSet Dec 13 '17 at 15:19

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