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In some movies, I have seen in Men in Black that a monster had fallen from top of a building backwards and actually lived.

In some other movies, there has been cases where people have fallen (the general scientific declaration of acceleration of 9.8m/s/s) from a high building and actually lived the impact of the ground below.

How do they do this? I'm sure I am missing something somewhere.

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    Well, in the case of Men in Black, the monster in question was CGI... – Steve-O Aug 6 '17 at 23:41
  • I'm aware of the monster being CGI, but the falling is my question, good try though. – natural Aug 6 '17 at 23:42
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    You're asking how a CGI monster could fall all the way to the ground and survive. It's CGI, it doesn't really exist. They just add the image of the monster in post going all the way down, frame after frame. Are you assuming there was a real stunt actor who made that jump and then they drew the monster over him? – Steve-O Aug 6 '17 at 23:53
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    You mention other movies, but not by name. If there are cases, name them. It goes a long way towards answering the question. – Gnemlock Aug 7 '17 at 0:11
  • I am fairly sure I did say (it may be broad) that there have been other cases, I am not going to physically put them down one by one by memory,. Other cases is all you need to know, and all I need to know is how they film it. Do I have to make myself any more clearer? – natural Aug 7 '17 at 0:16
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Ultimately, what is deemed to be plausible or otherwise is determined by the filmmakers. If they decide someone or something can live after falling off a tall building, and justify it in universe, then so be it. Examples I can think of are in Superman 2 and The Game.

As far as the techniques used for filming, it varies. Some that I've seen:

Blue/Green screen - Film a person flailing their limbs and screaming against a green screen, and composite them into a shot looking down from the top of a building.

CGI - Animate and render a model of the character falling, and composite them into the shot

Stunt fall - Have a trained stuntperson fall from a great height onto an inflatable stunt bag - filming only the jump and fall, omitting the landing.

And of course you have to show them landing. For that, you just need a separate shot where the actor/stuntperson lands after dropping from a much shorter height. My favourite example in this regard is in Terminator, where Michael Biehn was pushed off a ladder and filmed dropping hard onto the ground as he "travels back through time".

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