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In most of the movies, actually all that I can recall, scenes are pictured from the north. That is, if the land is on east we see it on the left side, and vice versa.

This is very confusing to me, as I picture the maps according to the scenes and if a fleet is attacking to a land on the left, I guess that it should be on the west side. As all the scenes that I recall are shot in the opposite direction of what I expect, I though I might be missing some technique or psychological point of view.

Some scenes which I can recall are:

  • Game of Thrones :

    1. On Blackwater Bay war, the fleet was attacking to right, though the city was in the west.

    2. At the scene where Sansa escapes from the King's Landing, the sea is again at the left hand side.

    3. Iron Islands are at the west side of Westeros. At the scenes which take part there, the land is on the east and the sea is on the west. We always see the sea on the right side.

    4. On episode 7.1, Deanarys reaches Westeros for the first time, an Westeros is on the right side.)

  • Troy : The Greek Fleet marches to the left and attacks the lands on the left had side, though Troy is in Anatolia, the east.

  • American Gods : At any scene where a ship arrives America (from the Old World), we see the ship going to the right side.

  • Band of Brothers: At the Invasion of Normandy scene, the troops march to the left, which should be the East.

  • Saving Private Ryan: Omaha Beach scene. When I started writing this question, this was going to be my only exception, but after I checked the map, I saw that this was also shot from the opposite direction. Though the attack is mainly from west to east (From America to Europe), the beach is actually directed to north-east, and again, the fleet is attacking the land on the top right side, which is at south-west. This tells me more, as they do not attack only to the right side, but the top right side, which shows, the director pictured it exactly from the north.

closed as too broad by Rand al'Thor, Paulie_D, John, A J, BCdotWEB Jul 19 '17 at 5:11

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    I disagree with the premise. My impression is that most shots are from the south, to match the "north-up" mental perspective most people in the US and Europe have of maps. – PoloHoleSet Jul 18 '17 at 17:15
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    @PoloHoleSet Can you please share some scenes? I started with one scene and wondered how the other scenes I recalled were shot, and all of them was "south-up". – Zafer Sernikli Jul 18 '17 at 17:18
  • I will do some digging and try to post some examples later. Also, possibly depending on the scene, if there's just open water to the north, and some sort of land-based backdrop to the south, then the south serves to make what's going on in the water easier to see. Omaha beach - the attack came from England, north, not America, west, and the beach, itself, faces east, not west. – PoloHoleSet Jul 18 '17 at 18:08
  • @ZaferSernikli could you share some images to support your examples - I'm not clear on what is wrong with "Band of Brothers: At the Invasion of Normandy scene, the troops march to the left, which should be the East.", for example, as I'm not clear what scene you are talking about... – HorusKol Jul 19 '17 at 3:56
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Saving Private Ryan: Omaha Beach scene. When I started writing this question, this was going to be my only exception, but after I checked the map, I saw that this was also shot from the opposite direction. Though the attack is mainly from west to east (From America to Europe), the beach is actually directed to north-east, and again, the fleet is attacking the land on the top right side, which is at south-west. This tells me more, as they do not attack only to the right side, but the top right side, which shows, the director pictured it exactly from the north.

In this particular case - the attack is not "from west to east" and certainly not "from America to Europe". The landing ships and planes came from southern England where the D-Day units had been based and in training for many months - almost directly to the north of the Normandy beaches.

We see a few shots from the south, giving us the German perspective of the landing - but mostly the action is shot from either behind the American Rangers as we follow them across the beach, or from west - to use the cultural/psychological expectation that moving from left (north) to right (south) demonstrates advancement. The scene ends with shots back to the North as the Americans overrun the German positions and finally Captain Miller looks out over the beach and the fleet beyond.

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