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So, I remember reading a while back some Black Panther comics but I remember that in the comics T'Chaka (father of T'Challa the current Black Panther) was killed by a character called Klaw. After doing some research, I found that in the comics:

"Explorer Ulysses Klaw finds his way to Wakanda, and covers up his work on a vibranium-powered, sound-based weapon. When exposed, Klaw kills T'Chaka, only to see his "sound blaster" turned on him by a grieving teenaged T'Challa. Klaw's right hand is destroyed, and he and his men flee."

However in "Captain America: Civil War" we learn that T'Chaka was killed in a conference by a terrorist attack with the sole purpose of trying to make the "Winter Soldier" a scapegoat. We learn that it was "Helmut Zemo (Baron Zemo)" that killed T'Chaka. Similiar to the comic books we find that T'Challa is also (pretty much) a teenager and a 'grieving' T'Challa tries to make it his sole purpose to kill 'Bucky Barnes' (The Winter Soldier).

I understand that the new fantasy/science fiction film, "Black Panther" (2018), is likely to follow on from the plot of Captain America: Civil War, because all new Marvel movies will progress on to Phase 3 ("The Avengers: Infinity War"). But I legitimately can't decide; who killed T'Chaka?

  • Teenager you say. Chadwick Boseman was 38 when Captain America Civil War was filmed. He looks younger than that, but he definitely looked late 20's - early 30's to me. – iandotkelly Feb 22 '18 at 20:33
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The MCU films all follow their own continuity, unrelated to the comics (but often inspired by them). MCU films should always be treated as existing within a shared universe, and as such the narrative of one movie/show will have a direct causal impact on the others.

If it is a Marvel Studios production: they all exist in the same place.

Any other Marvel production (Sony, Fox etc.) they will have a different relationship to the MCU and to each other, often with no narrative overlap.

T'Chaka was indeed killed in a terrorist attack, within the MCU continuity.

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