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After watching The Prince of Egypt, I saw these 3 lines appearing on the screen:

Screenshot with Jewish, Christian and Muslim references to Moses

Looks like very important lines to the movie, then why it appeared at very end of closing credits?

  • Related page from IMDb – Ankit Sharma May 18 '17 at 11:29
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    Are you asking about the location of the quotes or the reason for the inclusion? – Paulie_D May 18 '17 at 13:24
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    This is only speculation (which is why it'll put it in a comment), but the creation and release of the movie "The Prince of Egypt" was a religiously charged topic and faced backlash from various religious groups due to the movies religious nature (in fact the movie had to go through a number of rewrites to finally be released). So it's likely these final quotes where an effort by the writers to show that the movie wasn't written from a single religious view but instead wrote the movie considering the viewpoint from the 3 major religions that are influenced by the topic of Moses and Exodus. – onewho May 18 '17 at 13:32
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It is meant to point out that Moses is recognized as a prophet in the religious writings of three major world religions.

  • The first scripture is from Deuteronomy which is one of the books of the Hebrew bible.
  • The second is taken from the New Testament book of Acts which is recognized as scripture by Christianity.
  • The third is a quote from the Qur'ran which is a book of Islamic scripture.

Given the conflict and waging of holy wars through out history by these three religious groups, I believe the purpose of including these was to show that these religions are based in the same roots and have much in common. An appeal for peace and finding common ground if you will.

EDIT: I'm not sure if your question was specifically why the quotes appeared at the end of the credits as opposed to earlier, or if the question was what the significance was of the three quotes.

  • Pretty much what I said in my comment... – onewho Aug 31 '18 at 14:10

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