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What law was violated? What crime did he commit? From what I understand, the problem was; practicing law, without a law degree. Which, as far as I'm aware, isn't a crime.

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  • Maybe this is obvious to everyone but me, but, what show or movie? – userLTK May 3 '17 at 0:05
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    @userLTK look at the tags. [suits] "An American legal drama television series created and written by Aaron Korsh, debuted in 2011" – Memor-X May 3 '17 at 2:23
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    I looked into this a long time ago. ISTR that some states require a law degree to practice law (as well as passing the bar exam). Other states don't require a law degree to take and pass the bar exam. – Darren May 3 '17 at 13:04
  • @Riker Could it be that OP was not talking about ' Anyone who claims to have a license and refuses to identify themselves properly by first and last name can possibly lose any one or all of their licenses'? Perhaps OP was thinking it's not a crime to practice without a license where practice would not involve a claim, explicit or implicit, of having a license. – BCLC Sep 25 '18 at 14:35
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Fraud

The quote is...

"Michael James Ross, you're under arrest for conspiracy to commit fraud."

and

"By my estimation, you've worked on 88 legal cases in your so-called career, and you committed fraud every time you picked up the phone, mailed a letter, signed your name, or appeared in court. Each instance carries a nine-month sentence, and to tell you the truth, I am too tired to do the addition."

ABC News

In the gasp-inducing season 5 finale, the smooth-talker with the photographic memory, portrayed by actor Patrick J. Adams, was handed down a two-year sentence for fraud after practicing law without a degree for the last five years.

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