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Kurt Russell's character Jack Burton was fully human in Big Trouble in Little China. Then why he is shown so large in movie poster?

enter image description here

Is it for marketing the film on the name or Kurt or there is some symbolic meaning behind this representation?

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    Because he's big trouble... it's figurative... – cde Mar 17 '17 at 7:30
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Adding to Paulie_D's answer and fleshing out cde's, the image is also a literal interpretation of the title (which is metaphorical).

So, considering Big Trouble in Little China, Kurt Russel (the big trouble) is shown to be so much larger in the image than everyone else (the little china).

Not only does this emphasize Kurt Russel's role as the main character (as Paulie_D mentioned), but it is also a smart/funny stylistic interpretation of the movie's title (as cde mentioned).

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It's a stylistic device.

It's used to present your main hero(es) or characters as the primary part of the movie.

For instance, Star Wars. Clearly the character images are dispropotionate to their actual size and in relation to each other.

enter image description here

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    I used to hate this kind of posters. It'd just look like they tried to cram as much as possible with little artistic sense - which makes sense as it is a marketing piece, not an artistic one. – CyberClaw Mar 17 '17 at 12:26
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    Look at that! Vader's fist is almost as big as the Death Star! – Steve-O Mar 17 '17 at 13:33
  • It's Advertising 101. Your product, in this case a movie star, is front and center. The size relates to importance, nothing else. – Ralph Crown Aug 1 '17 at 15:07
  • @RalphCrown Your theory clearly does not hold for Star Wars. Alec Guiness was a huge star and Mark Hamill was an unknown. – Paulie_D Aug 1 '17 at 15:08

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