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I was wondering, how many Oscars are given out per category and whether they only produce as many as they really need (give out) or the maximum that they could give out (on that given day) and because of that, maybe keep some spare ones for the following year.

From 1983 to 2015,[12] approximately 50 Oscars were made each year in Chicago by Illinois manufacturer R.S. Owens & Company.

The time required to produce 50 such statuettes is roughly 3 months.
(currently)

-Wikipedia

If there are fewer people nominated in a category, than Oscars (reserved for that category) are given out, will that person get multiple Figures?

Obviously, there are only one Oscar per Actor in the 4 Acting Categories. One Actor will win and get the Oscar.

What if there are "fewer" people winning than the "max" Oscars given out per category?

Is there a max number of oscars per cathegory? If so, what is it?

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They don't know in advance how many are required:

The Academy is not certain how many statuettes it will hand out until the envelopes are opened on the night of the ceremony. Although the number of categories are known in advance, the possibility of ties and of multiple recipients sharing the prize in some categories makes it impossible to predict the exact number of statuettes to be awarded. Any surplus awards are housed in the Academy’s vault until the following year's event.

The statuettes are blank when they're shipped:

The business also creates name-tags for the nominees, who this year number more than 230, and ships those out to Los Angeles.

When winners receive their awards, the Oscar statuette is actually blank. At the Governor's Ball after the Oscar ceremony, winners have their name-tags affixed to their statuettes. Demchak will be on hand to help.

Note that there are limits for categories where multiple persons can be nominated:

When a film wins an Oscar, it’s the producer who accepts the golden statuette and gives the acceptance speech. Rules adopted by the academy in 2000 limits credited producers to three in order to avoid handing awards to a mob of “producers,” some of whom may have gained the credit for little or no effort.

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