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I live next door to one of the producers of "Blair Witch Project," (1999) so that got me to watch the movie.

Not recalling how long a personal home video recorder could work, I was wondering whether a two day hike that turned into a horror might have been recorded, should it have really happened. I realize it's just a movie, but we can see 90 minutes or so, and the implication is that there is much more.

I'm curious if the amateur filming of Blair Witch Project could have happened (and how)?

  • @Paulie_D I'm assuming without an energy source, there was no recharging. If there could be a replacement battery, I'd be interested to know how many there would need to be and when it could be done. PS - I'm happy to just enjoy a movie, but wanted to know. – Mikey Jan 10 '17 at 22:21
  • @Paulie_D - I'm happy to have it migrated, but not sure where it should have landed. I reckoned movie buffs might have previous input about movies with this kind of film technique (Cloverfield, et al). Maybe the question should have been about how it is reconciled. – Mikey Jan 10 '17 at 22:25
  • "found-footage" is the term I'm familiar with for this technique of making an entire movie look like it was shot on in-character camcorders or smart phones. IIRC, Blair Witch was the movie that coined that term, in fact. – Steve-O Jan 11 '17 at 2:13
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The action is shot on two cameras. A 16mm film camera [black and white] (which uses film magazines) and an RCA Hi8 Camcorder [color].

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They state in the first few minutes [c.2:25] of the film that...

"We've got so much fuckin' battery power we could.... .fuel a small world country for a month."

So, assuming the film magazines and camcorder tapes/cassettes (whatever) were recovered...which is the conceit...then they seem to have been well supplied with batteries to power both devices.

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